Bioprospecting of Microbial Diversity

Bioprospecting of Microbial Diversity

Challenges and Applications in Biochemical Industry, Agriculture and Environment Protection

1st Edition - February 1, 2022

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  • Editors: Pradeep Verma, Maulin Shah
  • Paperback ISBN: 9780323909587
  • eBook ISBN: 9780323885751

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Description

Bioprospecting of Microbial Diversity: Challenges and Applications in Biochemical Industry, Agriculture and Environment Protection gives a detailed insight into the utilization of microorganisms or microorganism-based bioactive compounds for the development of sustainable approaches, covering recent advances and challenges in the production and recovery of bioactive compounds such as enzymes, biopesticides, biofertilizers, biosensors, therapeutics, nutraceutical and pharmaceutical products. The challenges associated with the different approaches of microbial bioprospecting along with possible solutions to overcome these limitations are addressed. Further, the application of microbe-based products in the area of environmental pollution control and developing greener technologies are discussed. Providing valuable insight into the basics of microbial prospecting, the book covers established knowledge as well as genomic-based technological advancements to offer a better understanding of its application to various industries, promoting the commercialization of microbial-derived bioactive compounds and their application in biochemical industries, agriculture, and environmental protection studies.

Key Features

  • Describes the advanced techniques available for microbial bioprospecting for large-scale industrial production of bioactive compounds
  • Presents recent advances and challenges for the application of microbe-based products in agriculture and environment pollution control
  • Provides knowledge of microbial production of bioenergy and high-value compounds such as nutraceuticals and pharmaceuticals

Readership

Bio-Chemical Engineers, Environmental Engineers, Researchers, Graduate and Post-graduate students. Managers, Scientists, Environmental Science Managers, Administrators, Policy Makers, Environmental Consultants, Industry Persons and Doctoral Level working in the area of microbial bio-prospecting

Table of Contents

  • Cover image
  • Title page
  • Table of Contents
  • Copyright
  • Contributors
  • About the editors
  • Preface
  • Acknowledgment
  • Chapter 1: Role of bioinformatics tools in microbial prospectives and its future
  • Abstract
  • 1.1: Introduction
  • 1.2: Overview of the role of bioinformatics in microbiology
  • 1.3: Prokaryotic genome sequencing
  • 1.4: Prokaryotic genome annotation
  • 1.5: Microbial profiling
  • 1.6: Metagenomics and microbiome
  • 1.7: Analysis of the human microbiome with the 16s rRNA gene
  • 1.8: Phylogenetic microchips
  • 1.9: Bacterial genetic barcode and their uses
  • 1.10: NGS in microbial metabolism
  • 1.11: The role of genomics in finding microbes
  • 1.12: Genome scale metabolic reconstruction
  • 1.13: Summary
  • Chapter 2: Recent trends in genomic approaches for microbial bioprospecting
  • Abstract
  • 2.1: Introduction
  • 2.2: Overall scheme for genome-based bioprospecting
  • 2.3: Culture-independent methods
  • 2.4: Bioprospecting through RT-PCR
  • 2.5: Heterologous expression of secondary metabolite biosynthesis gene
  • 2.6: DNA microarrays
  • 2.7: PCR-independent amplification techniques
  • 2.8: Shift to metagenomic approach
  • 2.9: Synthetic biology approaches to hetero-expression of new gene clusters
  • 2.10: Conclusion
  • Chapter 3: Revolution in microbial bioprospecting via the development of omics-based technologies
  • Abstract
  • 3.1: Introduction
  • 3.2: Loopholes in microbial cultivation and emergence of culture-independent methods
  • 3.3: Development of “omics-based” approaches for microbial cultivation
  • 3.4: Potential applications of “omics” technology in microbial bioprospecting
  • 3.5: Conclusion
  • Chapter 4: Microbial assisted production of alcohols, acetone and glycerol
  • Abstract
  • 4.1: Introduction
  • 4.2: Production of acetone, butanol and ethanol through ABE fermentation
  • 4.3: Fermentative production of bio-butanol
  • 4.4: Fermentative production of acetone
  • 4.5: Fermentative production of bio-ethanol
  • 4.6: Fermentative production of bio-glycerol
  • 4.7: Microbial production of bio-methanol
  • 4.8: Conclusion
  • Chapter 5: Assessing technical and commercial aspects of soil microbiome in growing leguminous plants and formation of bio-fertilizer
  • Abstract
  • 5.1: Introduction
  • 5.2: Microbial ecosystem in soil
  • 5.3: Significance of microbiome in soil fertility management
  • 5.4: Symbiotic interaction with plants
  • 5.5: Green manure as bio-fertilizer
  • 5.6: Leguminous crops as bio-fertilizer
  • 5.7: Commercial aspects of bio-fertilizer
  • 5.8: Conclusion
  • Chapter 6: Mechanisms of multifarious soil microbial enzymes in plant growth promotion and environmental sustainability
  • Abstract
  • 6.1: Introduction
  • 6.2: Microbial enzymatic indexes
  • 6.3: Mechanisms of action of microbial enzymes
  • 6.4: Factors affecting microbial enzyme activities
  • 6.5: Microbial enzymes as potential indicators of soil contamination
  • 6.6: Conclusions and future prospects
  • Chapter 7: Bioprospecting of endophytes: Recent advances in endophytic microbes for industrially important bioactive compounds
  • Abstract
  • 7.1: Introduction
  • 7.2: Current scenario of endophytic bacteria
  • 7.3: Current scenario of endophytic fungi
  • 7.4: Conclusion and future prospects
  • Conflicts of interest
  • Chapter 8: MnP enzyme: Structure, mechanisms, distributions and its ample opportunities in biotechnological application
  • Abstract
  • Acknowledgment
  • 8.1: Introduction and structure
  • 8.2: Catalytic mechanisms of MnP enzyme
  • 8.3: Distribution in fungi and bacteria
  • 8.4: Physicochemical and molecular properties of MnP
  • 8.5: Effects of various environmental and nutritional parameters on enzyme activity
  • 8.6: Decomposition and action of mechanisms
  • 8.7: Ample opportunities in biotechnological application
  • 8.8: Conclusion
  • Chapter 9: Microbes and their products as novel therapeutics in medical applications
  • Abstract
  • 9.1: Introduction
  • 9.2: Prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines
  • 9.3: Virotherapy
  • 9.4: Microbes as source of antibiotics
  • 9.5: Clinical applications of microbial enzymes
  • 9.6: Bacterial therapeutic products
  • 9.7: Medical applications of fungi
  • 9.8: Conclusion
  • 9.9: Summary
  • Chapter 10: Bioprospecting potential of microbes for the therapeutic application
  • Abstract
  • 10.1: Introduction
  • 10.2: Microbial synthesized biologics
  • 10.3: Microorganism: A potential source of bioactive compounds
  • 10.4: Upgradation of microorganisms and synthesis of new analogs
  • 10.5: Future prospects of microbial biologics and conclusion
  • Chapter 11: Microbial bioprospecting in development of integrated biomass based biorefineries
  • Abstract
  • 11.1: Introduction
  • 11.2: Biorefinery concept in bioprocess industries
  • 11.3: Screening and identification methods of potential microbes
  • 11.4: Biotechnology in bioprospecting of microbes
  • 11.5: Case studies of successful biorefineries
  • 11.6: Future prospects
  • 11.7: Conclusion
  • Chapter 12: Microbial bioprospecting for biorefinery application: Bottlenecks and sustainability
  • Abstract
  • 12.1: Introduction
  • 12.2: Microbial bioprospecting
  • 12.3: Biorefinery
  • 12.4: Bioconversion routes
  • 12.5: Sustainability aspects of microbial bioprospecting for biorefinery
  • 12.6: Challenges of microbial biorefinery applications
  • 12.7: Conclusion
  • Chapter 13: Bioelectricity recovery from food waste using microbial fuel cell: Recent advances
  • Abstract
  • Practical application
  • 13.1: Introduction
  • 13.2: Traditional method for generation of bioelectricity from waster
  • 13.3: Food waste generation in the globe and its energy analysis
  • 13.4: Limitation of conventional food waste management technologies
  • 13.5: Microbial fuel cell—For simultaneous wastewater treatment and bioelectricity production
  • 13.6: Bioelectricity generation from food waste: Food sources as substrates for MFC
  • 13.7: Factors affecting the performance of MFC utilizing food waste
  • 13.8: Strategy to enhance the efficiency of MFC performance
  • 13.9: Techno-economic evaluation of microbial fuel cell
  • 13.10: MFC commercialization
  • 13.11: Challenges and limitation in MFC operation
  • 13.12: Perspective and conclusion
  • Chapter 14: Bioprospecting of microalgae derived high value compounds with commercial significance
  • Abstract
  • 14.1: Introduction
  • 14.2: Microalgae: Rich source of high-value compounds
  • 14.3: Pigments from microalgae
  • 14.4: Source of proteins and amino acids
  • 14.5: Functional carbohydrates
  • 14.6: Essential fatty acids
  • 14.7: Vitamins and minerals
  • 14.8: Current and projected global market
  • 14.9: Regulatory compliance
  • 14.10: Challenges and limitations
  • 14.11: Conclusion and future considerations
  • Chapter 15: Microbial bioprospecting for nutraceuticals and value-added compounds
  • Abstract
  • 15.1: Introduction
  • 15.2: Concept of nutraceuticals
  • 15.3: Classification
  • 15.4: Health benefits
  • 15.5: Need for microbial production of nutraceuticals
  • 15.6: Microbes and nutraceuticals
  • 15.7: Developments in delivery systems
  • 15.8: Microbiome for delivery of nutraceuticals
  • 15.9: Relevance and challenges of commercial production
  • 15.10: Conclusion/summary
  • Chapter 16: Biofilm interceded microbial prospecting of bioremediation
  • Abstract
  • 16.1: Introduction
  • 16.2: Bioremediation
  • 16.3: Role of biofilms in bioremediation
  • 16.4: Strategies for use of biofilms in remediation
  • 16.5: Bioremediation of various pollutants by biofilm
  • 16.6: Assessment of various methods of biofilm interceded bioremediation
  • 16.7: Future perspectives for bioremediation
  • 16.8: Summary
  • Chapter 17: Microbial-based eco-friendly processes for the recovery of metals from E-waste
  • Abstract
  • 17.1: Introduction
  • 17.2: Composition of E-waste
  • 17.3: Biotechnological approach for the recovery of metals from E-waste
  • 17.4: Future R&D
  • 17.5: Conclusion
  • Chapter 18: Evaluation of environment by microbial sensors
  • Abstract
  • 18.1: Introduction of microbial sensor
  • 18.2: Main components of a biosensor
  • 18.3: Working principle of a biosensor
  • 18.4: Types of biosensors
  • 18.5: Other sensor systems
  • 18.6: Implications of biosensor frameworks in the natural evaluation
  • 18.7: Applications of biosensor frameworks in the natural evaluation
  • 18.8: Pros and thorns of biosensor systems
  • 18.9: Future viewpoints of microbial sensors in ecological assessment
  • 18.10: Summary
  • Chapter 19: Insight into microbial biosensors: Design, types and applications
  • Abstract
  • 19.1: Introduction
  • 19.2: Advantages of microbial biosensors
  • 19.3: Design of microbial biosensors
  • 19.4: Types of microbial biosensors based on types of sensing mechanism
  • 19.5: Applications of microbial sensors in different areas
  • 19.6: Conclusion
  • Chapter 20: New strategies in microbial screening for novel chemotherapeutics
  • Abstract
  • 20.1: Introduction
  • 20.2: Conventional chemotherapeutics and their limitations
  • 20.3: Microbial extracts as novel chemotherapeutics
  • 20.4: New strategies for screening microbes to isolate chemotherapeutic metabolites
  • 20.5: Future perspectives and conclusions
  • Conflict of interest
  • Chapter 21: Seaweeds as potential source of bioactive compounds with special emphasis on bioprospecting in COVID-19 situation
  • Abstract
  • 21.1: Introduction
  • 21.2: Current treatment scenario for COVID-19
  • 21.3: Bioactive antiviral compounds from seaweeds
  • 21.4: Bioactive compounds from seaweeds with a beneficial role in general human health and immunity
  • 21.5: Bioactive compounds from seaweeds controlling secondary infections
  • 21.6: Potential role of seaweed-derived bioactive compounds as a therapeutic agent in COVID-19 disease management
  • 21.7: Conclusion
  • Chapter 22: Bioprospecting of extremophiles for industrial enzymes
  • Abstract
  • 22.1: Introduction
  • 22.2: Extremozymes and their industrial significance
  • 22.3: Extremozymes from thermophiles
  • 22.4: Extremozymes from psychrophiles
  • 22.5: Conclusion and future challenges
  • Competing interests
  • Chapter 23: Bioenergy: An overview of bioenergy as a sustainable and renewable source of energy
  • Abstract
  • 23.1: Introduction
  • 23.2: Bioethanol
  • 23.3: Biodiesel
  • 23.4: Biogas and biohydrogen
  • 23.5: Advance bioenergy
  • 23.6: Challenges
  • 23.7: Conclusion
  • Chapter 24: Microbial diversity and bioprospecting potential of Phragmites rhizosphere microbiome through genomic approaches
  • Abstract
  • Acknowledgment
  • 24.1: Introduction
  • 24.2: Structure and function of Phragmites microbiome
  • 24.3: P. karka rhizosphere microbiome: An unexplored niche for bioprospecting
  • 24.4: Conclusions and perspectives
  • Index

Product details

  • No. of pages: 564
  • Language: English
  • Copyright: © Elsevier 2022
  • Published: February 1, 2022
  • Imprint: Elsevier
  • Paperback ISBN: 9780323909587
  • eBook ISBN: 9780323885751

About the Editors

Pradeep Verma

Prof. Pradeep Verma is a group leader of Bioprocess and Bioenergy Laboratory at the Department of Microbiology, School of Life Sciences, CURAJ. His area of expertise covers microbial diversity, bioremediation, bioprocess development, and lignocellulosic and algal biomass-based biorefinery. He also holds 12 international patents in the field of microwave-assisted biomass pretreatment and biobutanol production. He has more than 60 research articles in peer-reviewed international journals and contributed to several book chapters (28 published; 15 in press) in various edited books. He has also edited 3 books for international publishers such as Springer and Elsevier. He is on the editorial board of several prestigious journals. Also, he has been a reviewer for more than 40 journals spanning several publishers such as Springer, Elsevier, RSC, ACS, Nature, Frontiers, and MDPI.

Affiliations and Expertise

Professor, Department of Microbiology, Central University of Rajasthan, Rajasthan, India

Maulin Shah

Dr. Maulin P. Shah is Chief Scientist and Head of the Industrial Waste Water Research Lab, Division of Applied and Environmental Microbiology Lab at Enviro Technology Ltd., Ankleshwar, Gujarat, India. His work focuses on the impact of industrial pollution on the microbial diversity of wastewater following cultivation-dependent and cultivation-independent analysis. His major work involves isolation, screening, identification, and genetically engineering high-impact microbes for the degradation of hazardous materials. His research interests include biological wastewater treatment, environmental microbiology, biodegradation, bioremediation, and phytoremediation of environmental pollutants from industrial wastewaters. He has published more than 250 research papers in national and international journals of repute on various aspects of microbial biodegradation and bioremediation of environmental pollutants. He is the editor of more than 50 books of international repute (Elsevier, Springer, RSC, and CRC Press). He is an active editorial board member in top-rated journals.

Affiliations and Expertise

Industrial Waste Water Research Laboratory, Division of Applied and Environmental Microbiology, Gujarat, India

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