Biomaterials for Vasculogenesis and Angiogenesis

Biomaterials for Vasculogenesis and Angiogenesis

1st Edition - May 19, 2022

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  • Editors: Saeid Kargozar, Masoud Mozafari
  • Paperback ISBN: 9780128218679
  • eBook ISBN: 9780128218686

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Description

Biomaterials for Angiogenesis and Vasculogenesis covers the application of materials designed to encourage new blood vessel formation. Angiogenesis and vasculogenesis play an important role in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine research by promoting vascular networks inside engineered tissues and thereby increasing tissue healing and regeneration. However, researchers are faced with the challenge of finding suitable materials for improving angiogenesis and vascular formation in assays. This book reviews a broad range of biomaterials for the promotion of blood vessel genesis, from polymers and bioactive glass, to nanomaterial scaffolds and 3D angiogenic constructs. In addition, the book covers a variety of applications for biomaterials in tissue repair and regeneration, including cardiovascular regeneration, liver tissue engineering and much more. It will serve as a detailed reference for researchers in academia and industry, working in the fields of biomedical science and engineering, materials science, regenerative medicine and translational medicine.

Key Features

  • Introduces readers to the molecular and cellular basis of angiogenesis and vasculogenesis
  • Helps researchers find suitable biomaterials to promote angiogenesis in engineered tissues and assays
  • Describes a range of biomaterials and their properties, including glass-ceramics, nano-carriers, polymers, and more

Readership

Biomedical scientists, biomedical engineers, materials scientists and clinical scientists with a specific interest in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. R&D groups working on cardiovascular implants and devices, and/or tissue engineering

Table of Contents

  • Cover Image
  • Title Page
  • Copyright
  • Table of Contents
  • Contributors
  • Foreword for “Biomaterials for Vasculogenesis and Angiogenesis”
  • Preface for “Biomaterials for Vasculogenesis and Angiogenesis”
  • Chapter 1 Angiogenesis and vasculogenesis: Status in tissue engineering
  • 1.1 Tissue engineering: From repair toward regeneration
  • 1.2 Importance of vasculogenesis and angiogenesis in tissue engineering
  • 1.3 Biomaterials for improved angiogenesis
  • 1.4 Bioactive molecules and stem cells for promoted angiogenesis
  • 1.5 Therapeutic angiogenesis: Concepts for clinical practices
  • References
  • Chapter 2 Molecular mediators of vasculogenesis and angiogenesis
  • 2.1 Introduction
  • 2.2 Overview of the vasculogenesis, angiogenesis, and arteriogenesis
  • 2.3 The process of angiogenesis
  • 2.4 Proangiogenic growth factors and cytokines
  • 2.5 Inhibitors of angiogenesis
  • 2.6 Maturation of angiogenesis
  • 2.7 Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 3 The role of cells in vascular network formation and angiogenesis induction
  • 3.1 Introduction
  • 3.2 Human vascular system: An overview
  • 3.3 Basic structure of vessels
  • 3.4 Cellular crosstalk during vasculogenesis and angiogenesis
  • 3.5 Immune cells and angiogenesis
  • 3.6 Stem/progenitors cells for improved angiogenesis
  • 3.7 Summary and concluding remarks
  • References
  • Chapter 4 The importance of extracellular matrix (ECM) in vasculogenesis and angiogenesis
  • 4.1 Introduction
  • 4.2 ECM-cell communication
  • 4.3 ECM: A reservoir for growth factors and matricellular proteins
  • 4.4 Effect of ECM components on angiogenesis
  • 4.5 Proangiogenic components of ECM
  • 4.6 Antiangiogenic components of the ECM
  • 4.7 ECM remodeling and angiogenesis
  • Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 5 Role of growth factors and cytokines in therapeutic angiogenesis
  • 5.1 Introduction
  • 5.2 Proangiogenic GFs
  • 5.3 Angiogenic cytokines
  • 5.4 Other GFs and cytokines
  • 5.5 Summary
  • References
  • Chapter 6 Interplay between angiogenesis and neurogenesis in nerve regeneration
  • 6.1 Introduction
  • 6.2 Nerve regeneration in nervous system
  • 6.3 Tissue engineering strategies in nerve regeneration
  • 6.4 Cells for nerve regeneration
  • 6.5 Growth factors in nerve regeneration
  • 6.6 Angiogenesis in injured nervous system
  • 6.7 Conventional nerve grafts
  • 6.8 Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 7 Detection assays for vasculogenesis and angiogenesis
  • 7.1 Introduction
  • 7.2 In vitro assays
  • 7.3 Ex vivo assays
  • 7.4 In vivo assays
  • Conclusions and future outlook
  • References
  • Chapter 8 The effects of medicinal herbs and phytochemicals on angiogenesis and models of wound healing
  • 8.1 Introduction
  • 8.2 Phytochemicals and herbs in medicine: A brief history
  • 8.3 Medicinal herbs for modulating angiogenesis
  • 8.4 Phytochemicals
  • Conclusions and future outlook
  • References
  • Chapter 9 Calcium phosphate bioceramics for improved angiogenesis
  • 9.1 Introduction
  • 9.2 CaPs bioceramics: An overview
  • 9.3 Clinical significance of angiogenesis in bone regeneration
  • 9.4 CaPs bioceramics for improved angiogenesis
  • 9.5 CaPs bioceramics for delivery of proangiogenic bioactive molecules
  • 9.6 Summary and future perspectives
  • References
  • Chapter 10 Angiogenesis induction by bioactive glasses and glass-ceramics
  • 10.1 Introduction
  • 10.2 The role of ionic dissolution products from bioactive glasses in angiogenesis
  • 10.3 Bioactive glass particles
  • 10.4 Bioactive glass scaffolds
  • 10.5 Bioactive glass coatings
  • 10.6 Bioactive glass fibers
  • 10.7 Composite materials incorporating bioactive glasses
  • Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 11 Angiogenesis induction by natural and synthetic polymers
  • 11.1 Introduction
  • 11.2 Angiogenesis
  • 11.3 Angiogenic natural and synthetic biomaterials
  • Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 12 Composites for angiogenesis induction
  • 12.1 Introduction
  • 12.2 Angiogenesis
  • 12.3 Angiogenesis inducers
  • 12.4 Role of biomaterials in promoting angiogenesis
  • 12.5 Applications of composite biomaterials for angiogenesis induction
  • Conclusions
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Chapter 13 Three-dimensional (3D) angiogenic constructs
  • 13.1 Introduction
  • 13.2 Micropatterning
  • 13.3 Nanofabrication of vascular networks
  • 13.4 Constructing vascular structures with sacrificial materials
  • References
  • Chapter 14 Engineered vascularized tissue organs
  • 14.1 Introduction
  • 14.2 Microvascular (MVS) and tissue engineered blood vessels (TEBV)
  • 14.3 Tissue engineering approaches for vascularized tissue/organs formation
  • 14.4 Cell-based engineering
  • 14.5 Clinical translation
  • 14.6 Challenges and opportunities
  • References
  • Chapter 15 Role of organic nanomaterials in angiogenesis
  • 15.1 Introduction
  • 15.2 Organic NMs
  • 15.3 Organic nanomaterials play the role of a delivery vehicle
  • 15.4 Advanced delivery systems
  • 15.5 Mechanisms of action
  • 15.6 Endothelial cell proliferation
  • 15.7 Endothelial cell migration
  • 15.8 Mural cell recruitment
  • 15.9 Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 16 Inorganic nanomaterials for improved angiogenesis
  • 16.1 Introduction
  • 16.2 Inorganic nanomaterials for improved angiogenesis
  • 16.3 Summary and future prospects
  • References
  • Chapter 17 Nanosized carriers for delivery of angiogenic materials
  • 17.1 Introduction
  • 17.2 Living and nonliving angiogenic materials
  • 17.3 Nanovehicles for angiogenic delivery
  • 17.4 Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 18 Electrospun nanofibers for angiogenesis strategies
  • 18.1 Introduction
  • 18.2 Electrospinning: An overview
  • 18.3 Polymers for electrospinning
  • 18.4 Electrospun nanofibers meet angiogenesis
  • 18.5 Angiogenic nanofibers for applied tissue engineering
  • 18.6 Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 19 Biomaterials for angiogenesis applications in an orthopedic context
  • 19.1 Defining clinical problems
  • 19.2 Critical-size bone-defects and nonunions
  • 19.3 Limitations of traditional therapy strategies
  • 19.4 Embryonic skeletal development and bone healing
  • 19.5 Traditional strategies for Bone-Tissue-Engineering
  • 19.6 Are there better strategies?
  • 19.7 What are bioactive glasses?
  • 19.8 Are there any side effects to bioactive glasses?
  • 19.9 Ionic dissolution products from bioactive glasses
  • References
  • Chapter 20 Skin wound healing: The critical role of angiogenesis
  • 20.1 Introduction
  • 20.2 Skin tissue: Anatomical and histological features
  • 20.3 Skin wounds and diseases
  • 20.4 Current therapies for chronic wounds
  • 20.5 Tissue-engineered skin substitutes
  • 20.6 The critical role of angiogenesis in skin wound healing
  • 20.7 Proangiogenic strategies for skin regeneration and wound healing
  • 20.8 Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 21 Role of angiogenesis in bladder tissue engineering
  • 21.1 Introduction
  • 21.2 Tissue engineering of bladder
  • 21.3 Angiogenesis strategies in the bladder tissue engineering
  • 21.4 Detection methods of angiogenesis in bladder tissue engineering
  • 21.5 Conclusions and perspective
  • References
  • Index

Product details

  • No. of pages: 520
  • Language: English
  • Copyright: © Woodhead Publishing 2022
  • Published: May 19, 2022
  • Imprint: Woodhead Publishing
  • Paperback ISBN: 9780128218679
  • eBook ISBN: 9780128218686

About the Editors

Saeid Kargozar

Dr. Saeid Kargozar is currently an Assistant Professor of Tissue Engineering and Applied Cell Sciences at Mashhad University of Medical Sciences (MUMS), Mashhad, Iran. He earned a Bachelor in Radiology Technology from Iran University of Medical Sciences (IUMS), a Master in Medical Biotechnology from Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS), and his Ph.D. degree in Tissue Engineering from TUMS in 2016. As the head of tissue engineering laboratory, Dr. Kargozar is the supervisor of a couple of master and Ph.D. students in the field of biomaterials and tissue engineering. He is actively working on natural and synthetic biomaterials (especially bioactive glasses) for repair and regeneration of injured tissues. As rebuilding vessels for damaged tissues and organs are of great importance in reconstructive strategies, the induction of angiogenesis by using biocompatible materials forms a big part of Dr. Kargozar's research goals.

Affiliations and Expertise

Assistant Professor, Tissue Engineering and Applied Cell Sciences, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences (MUMS), Mashhad, Iran

Masoud Mozafari

Masoud Mozafari
Dr. Masoud Mozafari is a Fellow at Lunenfeld Tanenbaum Research Institute, Mount Sinai Health Hospital, University of Toronto. He was previously Assistant Professor and Director of the Bioengineering Lab, at the Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials Department, Materials and Energy Research Center, Cellular and Molecular Research Center, and Department of Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine of the Iran University of Medical Sciences (IUMS), Tehran, Iran. Dr. Mozafari’s research interests range across biomaterials, nanotechnology, and tissue engineering, and he is known for the development of strategies for the treatment of damaged tissues and organs, and controlling biological substances for targeted delivery into the human body. Dr. Mozafari has received several awards, including the Khwarizmi Award and the Julia Polak European Doctorate Award for outstanding translational research contributions to the field of biomaterials. He has also received the WIPO Medal for Inventors from The World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO), in recognition of his contributions to economic and technological development. Dr. Mozafari is currently working on the editorial board of several journals.

Affiliations and Expertise

Research Fellow, Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute, Mount Sinai Hospital, University of Toronto, Canada

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