Bioinformatics in Agriculture

Bioinformatics in Agriculture

Next Generation Sequencing Era

1st Edition - April 26, 2022

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  • Editors: Pradeep Sharma, Dinesh Yadav, R.K. Gaur
  • Paperback ISBN: 9780323897785
  • eBook ISBN: 9780323885997

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Description

Bioinformatics in Agriculture: Next Generation Sequencing Era is a comprehensive volume presenting an integrated research and development approach to the practical application of genomics to improve agricultural crops. Exploring both the theoretical and applied aspects of computational biology, and focusing on the innovation processes, the book highlights the increased productivity of a translational approach. Presented in four sections and including insights from experts from around the world, the book includes: Section I: Bioinformatics and Next Generation Sequencing Technologies; Section II: Omics Application; Section III: Data mining and Markers Discovery; Section IV: Artificial Intelligence and Agribots. Bioinformatics in Agriculture: Next Generation Sequencing Era explores deep sequencing, NGS, genomic, transcriptome analysis and multiplexing, highlighting practices forreducing time, cost, and effort for the analysis of gene as they are pooled, and sequenced. Readers will gain real-world information on computational biology, genomics, applied data mining, machine learning, and artificial intelligence. This book serves as a complete package for advanced undergraduate students, researchers, and scientists with an interest in bioinformatics.

Key Features

  • Discusses integral aspects of molecular biology and pivotal tool sfor molecular breeding
  • Enables breeders to design cost-effective and efficient breeding strategies
  • Provides examples ofinnovative genome-wide marker (SSR, SNP) discovery
  • Explores both the theoretical and practical aspects of computational biology with focus on innovation processes
  • Covers recent trends of bioinformatics and different tools and techniques

Readership

Advanced undergraduate students, researchers and scientists with an interest in bioinformatics applied in agriculture

Table of Contents

  • Cover image
  • Title page
  • Table of Contents
  • Copyright
  • List of contributors
  • About the editors
  • Foreword
  • Preface
  • Section I: Bioinformatics and next-generation sequencing technologies (Chapters 1–14)
  • Section II: Omics application (Chapters 15–26)
  • Section III: Data mining and markers discovery (Chapters 27–33)
  • Section IV: Artificial intelligence and agribots (Chapters 34–37)
  • Section I: Bioinformatics and next generation sequencing technologies
  • Chapter 1. Advances in agricultural bioinformatics: an outlook of multi “omics” approaches
  • Abstract
  • 1.1 Introduction
  • 1.2 Different types of “omics” approaches
  • 1.3 Conclusions and future prospective
  • References
  • Chapter 2. Promises and benefits of omics approaches to data-driven science industries
  • Abstract
  • 2.1 Sequencing technologies
  • 2.2 Advances in genome assembly technology
  • 2.3 Transcriptomics—where genome connects to gene function
  • 2.4 Beyond genomics and transcriptomics toward proteomics and metabolomics
  • 2.5 Integrating omics datasets
  • 2.6 Challenges
  • 2.7 Machine learning in omics
  • 2.8 Big data storage and management
  • 2.9 Future directions
  • References
  • Chapter 3. Bioinformatics intervention in functional genomics: current status and future perspective—an overview
  • Abstract
  • 3.1 Introduction
  • 3.2 Functional genomic approaches
  • 3.3 Serial analysis of gene expression
  • 3.4 DNA microarray
  • 3.5 Next-generation sequencing technologies
  • 3.6 Databases and genome annotation
  • 3.7 Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 4. Genome informatics: present status and future prospects in agriculture
  • Abstract
  • 4.1 Introduction
  • 4.2 The evolution of DNA-seq
  • 4.3 Genomics in agriculture
  • 4.4 Conclusion, applications, and future prospects of next-generation sequencing in agriculture
  • References
  • Chapter 5. Genomics and its role in crop improvement
  • Abstract
  • 5.1 Introduction
  • 5.2 Development of genomic resources
  • 5.3 Application of genomic resources for crop improvement
  • 5.4 Genome analysis
  • 5.5 Applications of genomics
  • 5.6 Next-generation genomics for crop improvement
  • 5.7 Genomic features for future breeding
  • References
  • Chapter 6. Genome-wide predictions, structural and functional annotations of plant transcription factor gene families: a bioinformatics approach
  • Abstract
  • 6.1 Transcription factor: an introduction
  • 6.2 Plant transcription factors and its multifarious applications
  • 6.3 Transcription factors for biotic and abiotic tolerance
  • 6.4 Transcription factor databases
  • 6.5 Bioinformatics tools used for structural and functional analysis of transcription factor gene families
  • 6.6 Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 7. Proteomics as a tool to understand the biology of agricultural crops
  • Abstract
  • 7.1 Introduction
  • 7.2 Gel-based proteomics
  • 7.3 Gel-free proteomics
  • 7.4 High-throughput posttranslational modification proteomics
  • 7.5 Conclusion
  • References
  • Further reading
  • Chapter 8. Metabolomics and sustainable agriculture: concepts, applications, and perspectives
  • Abstract
  • 8.1 Introduction
  • 8.2 Sustainable agriculture and agro-production systems
  • 8.3 Concepts of metabolomics and their applications to agriculture
  • 8.4 Bridging metabolomics to sustainable agriculture
  • 8.5 Conclusions and future perspectives
  • References
  • Chapter 9. Plant metabolomics: a new era in the advancement of agricultural research
  • Abstract
  • 9.1 An introduction to metabolomics
  • 9.2 Significance of metabolomics in plant biotechnology
  • 9.3 Technologies involved in metabolomics improvement
  • 9.4 Metabolomics databases
  • 9.5 Metabolite profiling, identification, and quantification
  • 9.6 Metabolic engineering in plants
  • 9.7 Environmental and ecological metabolomics
  • 9.8 Extraction methods in metabolomics
  • 9.9 Metabolomics-assisted breeding techniques
  • 9.10 Metabolites present in plant metabolome
  • 9.11 Workflow of metabolomics analysis
  • 9.12 Current and emerging methodologies of metabolomics in agriculture
  • 9.13 Integration of metabolomics tools with other omics tools
  • 9.14 Metabolomics under normal and stress conditions in plants
  • 9.15 Applications and future perspective of metabolomics in plant biotechnology and agriculture
  • References
  • Chapter 10. Explore the RNA-sequencing and the next-generation sequencing in crops responding to abiotic stress
  • Abstract
  • 10.1 Introduction
  • 10.2 From the beginning to the crop sciences: transcriptome analysis, its evolution, and state of the art
  • 10.3 The overview on plant sequencing of RNA studies
  • 10.4 The RNA-sequencing analysis workflow
  • 10.5 Functional genomics
  • 10.6 Final considerations
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Chapter 11. Identification of novel RNAs in plants with the help of next-generation sequencing technologies
  • Abstract
  • 11.1 Introduction
  • 11.2 Small RNA
  • 11.3 Long noncoding RNA
  • 11.4 Circular RNA
  • 11.5 Chimeric RNA
  • References
  • Chapter 12. Molecular evolution, three-dimensional structural characteristics, mechanism of action, and functions of plant beta-galactosidases
  • Abstract
  • 12.1 Introduction
  • 12.2 Protein sequence features of plant beta-galactosidases
  • 12.3 Molecular evolution of beta-galactosidases and their classification
  • 12.4 Three-dimensional structural characteristics of plant beta-galactosidases
  • 12.5 Structural comparison between MiBGAL and TBG4
  • 12.6 Substrate specificity of plant beta-galactosidases
  • 12.7 Mechanism of action of plant beta-galactosidases
  • 12.8 Physiological function of plant beta-galactosidase
  • 12.9 Conclusion
  • Conflict of interest
  • References
  • Chapter 13. Next generation genomics: toward decoding domestication history of crops
  • Abstract
  • 13.1 Introduction
  • 13.2 Whole genome sequencing
  • 13.3 Alternative genome scale approaches
  • 13.4 Emergence of pan-genomics
  • 13.5 Methodologies in domestication genomics
  • 13.6 Case studies on next-generation sequencing-assisted inference of domestication history
  • References
  • Chapter 14. In-silico identification of small RNAs: a tiny silent tool against agriculture pest
  • Abstract
  • 14.1 Introduction
  • 14.2 Small RNAs
  • 14.3 Types of small noncoding RNAs
  • 14.4 Next-generation sequencing in agronomic advancements
  • 14.5 Small RNA world and their identification
  • 14.6 Limitations
  • 14.7 Conclusion
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Section II: Omics application
  • Chapter 15. Bioinformatics-assisted multiomics approaches to improve the agronomic traits in cotton
  • Abstract
  • 15.1 Introduction
  • 15.2 Big data in biology and omics
  • 15.3 Bioinformatics resources for cotton-omics
  • 15.4 Integration of multiomics data to cope with cotton plant diseases
  • 15.5 Challenges in the integration and analysis of multiomics data of cotton
  • 15.6 Conclusion
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Chapter 16. Omics-assisted understanding of BPH resistance in rice: current updates and future prospective
  • Abstract
  • 16.1 Introduction
  • 16.2 Rice genomics in brown planthopper resistance
  • 16.3 Rice transcriptomics in brown planthopper resistance
  • 16.4 Rice proteomics in brown planthopper resistance
  • 16.5 Rice metabolomics in brown planthopper resistance
  • 16.6 Bioinformatics in brown planthopper resistance in rice
  • 16.7 Conclusion and future prospective
  • References
  • Chapter 17. Contemporary genomic approaches in modern agriculture for improving tomato varieties
  • Abstract
  • 17.1 Importance and origin of tomatoes
  • 17.2 Organization of tomato genome and genetic variation of tomato cultivars
  • 17.3 Tomato breeding
  • 17.4 Disease resistance
  • 17.5 Insect resistance
  • 17.6 Abiotic stress tolerance
  • 17.7 Tomato genetic markers for selection
  • 17.8 Genomic selection for abiotic stress in tomato
  • 17.9 Tomato transcriptomics
  • 17.10 Tomato proteomics
  • 17.11 Tomato metabolomics
  • References
  • Chapter 18. Characterization of drought tolerance in maize: omics approaches
  • Abstract
  • 18.1 Introduction
  • 18.2 Drought timing
  • 18.3 Plant response to drought
  • 18.4 Progress with conventional breeding strategies for drought tolerance in maize
  • 18.5 Omics for characterizing drought stress responses in maize
  • 18.6 Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 19. Deciphering the genomic hotspots in wheat for key breeding traits using comparative and structural genomics
  • Abstract
  • 19.1 Introduction
  • 19.2 Genomic comparisons and gene discovery
  • 19.3 Genomic hotspots in wheat
  • 19.4 Genomic sequences to genomic hotspot
  • 19.5 Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 20. Prospects of molecular markers for wheat improvement in postgenomic era
  • Abstract
  • 20.1 Introduction
  • 20.2 Overview of molecular marker systems in wheat
  • 20.3 Genome-wide markers for gene mapping
  • 20.4 Wheat genomics for development of marker and its utilization
  • 20.5 Status of genotyping platform of bread wheat and its progenitors
  • 20.6 Utility and achievement of high-throughput genotyping approaches in wheat
  • 20.7 Conversion of trait-linked SNPs to user-friendly markers
  • 20.8 Conclusions and future directions
  • References
  • Chapter 21. Omics approaches for biotic, abiotic, and quality traits improvement in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.)
  • Abstract
  • 21.1 Introduction
  • 21.2 Potato genomics
  • 21.3 Potato transcriptomic
  • 21.4 Potato proteomics
  • 21.5 Potato metabolomics
  • 21.6 Potato ionomics
  • 21.7 Phenomics
  • 21.8 Potato omics resources and integration of technologies
  • 21.9 Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 22. Tea plant genome sequencing: prospect for crop improvement using genomics tools
  • Abstract
  • 22.1 Introduction
  • 22.2 Whole-genome sequencing of tea plant
  • 22.3 Identification and characterization of gene families
  • 22.4 Tea transcriptome sequencing
  • 22.5 Discovery of single-nucleotide polymorphism
  • 22.6 Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 23. Next-generation sequencing and viroid research
  • Abstract
  • 23.1 Introduction
  • 23.2 Next-generation sequencing technology
  • 23.3 Impact of next-generation sequencing on viroid discovery
  • 23.4 Role of next-generation sequencing in unraveling viroid RNA biology
  • 23.5 Bioinformatic intervention in next-generation sequencing
  • 23.6 Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 24. Computational analysis for plant virus analysis using next-generation sequencing
  • Abstract
  • 24.1 Introduction
  • 24.2 Development of next-generation sequencing technology
  • 24.3 Next-generation sequencing data analysis by bioinformatics tools
  • 24.4 Next-generation sequencing in plant virology
  • 24.5 Challenges
  • 24.6 Conclusion and future prospective
  • References
  • Chapter 25. Microbial degradation of herbicides in contaminated soils by following computational approaches
  • Abstract
  • 25.1 Herbicides: use and impact on environment
  • 25.2 Microbial degradation of herbicides
  • 25.3 Strategies to improve biodegradation of herbicides
  • 25.4 Integration of computational biology to improve biodegradation of herbicides
  • 25.5 Bioremediation of atrazine by following metabolic modeling method
  • 25.6 Conclusion
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Chapter 26. Chloroplast genome and plant–virus interaction
  • Abstract
  • 26.1 Introduction
  • 26.2 Chloroplast genome
  • 26.3 Viral infection symptoms in plants
  • 26.4 Role of chloroplasts in plant–virus life cycle
  • 26.5 Role of chloroplast in the defense against plant pathogenic viruses
  • 26.6 Plant–virus metagenomics
  • 26.7 Conclusion
  • References
  • Section III: Data mining, markers discovery
  • Chapter 27. Deciphering soil microbiota using metagenomic approach for sustainable agriculture: an overview
  • Abstract
  • 27.1 Introduction
  • 27.2 Sustainable agriculture
  • 27.3 Soil microbiomes
  • 27.4 Soil microbial diversity
  • 27.5 Analysis of the rhizosphere microbial community
  • 27.6 Metagenomics in agriculture
  • 27.7 Metagenomics for sustainable agriculture
  • 27.8 Concluding remarks
  • References
  • Chapter 28. Concepts and applications of bioinformatics for sustainable agriculture
  • Abstract
  • 28.1 Introduction—a conceptual framework for sustainable agriculture
  • 28.2 Database resources for agricultural bioinformatics
  • 28.3 Genome mapping
  • 28.4 DNA marker development and application to genotyping
  • 28.5 Genome-wide association studies
  • 28.6 Emerging strategies for breeding and genetics
  • 28.7 Conclusion and future prospects
  • References
  • Chapter 29. Application of high-throughput structural and functional genomic technologies in crop nutrition research
  • Abstract
  • 29.1 Introduction
  • 29.2 Structural genomics
  • 29.3 Application of structural genomics
  • 29.4 Dynamic expression of functional genomics
  • 29.5 Functional genomics approaches
  • 29.6 Developing genomic technologies for enhancing food crops security
  • 29.7 Application of high-throughput genomics technologies in nutrition research
  • References
  • Further reading
  • Chapter 30. Bioinformatics approach for whole transcriptomics-based marker prediction in agricultural crops
  • Abstract
  • 30.1 Introduction to transcriptomics
  • 30.2 Markers
  • 30.3 Markers in plants
  • 30.4 Expressed sequence tags and simple sequence repeats
  • 30.5 Tools for generating transcriptomic data
  • 30.6 Why transcriptomic markers?
  • 30.7 How are markers developed/selected?
  • 30.8 What has been done
  • 30.9 Future prospects
  • References
  • Chapter 31. Computational approaches toward single-nucleotide polymorphism discovery and its applications in plant breeding
  • Abstract
  • 31.1 Introduction
  • 31.2 Single-nucleotide polymorphism discovery
  • 31.3 Single-nucleotide polymorphism annotation
  • 31.4 Single-nucleotide polymorphism database
  • 31.5 Single-nucleotide polymorphism genotyping
  • 31.6 Application of single-nucleotide polymorphisms in plants
  • 31.7 Conclusion and prospects
  • Acknowledgment
  • References
  • Chapter 32. Bioinformatics intervention in identification and development of molecular markers: an overview
  • Abstract
  • 32.1 Introduction
  • 32.2 Genetic markers
  • 32.3 Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP)
  • 32.4 Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD)
  • 32.5 Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP)
  • 32.6 Simple sequence repeats (SSR)
  • 32.7 Intersimple sequence repeat (ISSR)
  • 32.8 Single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)
  • 32.9 Quantitative trait loci (QTL)
  • 32.10 Association mapping
  • 32.11 Marker-assisted selection (MAS)
  • 32.12 Bioinformatics intervention in molecular markers
  • 32.13 Software for simple sequence repeats discovery
  • 32.14 Software for single-nucleotide polymorphism discovery
  • References
  • Chapter 33. Deciphering comparative and structural variation that regulates abiotic stress response
  • Abstract
  • 33.1 Introduction
  • 33.2 Expression quantitative trait loci and their functional significance
  • 33.3 Regulatory small RNAs
  • 33.4 Epigenomic regulation of gene expression in plant
  • 33.5 Protein structure provides vital information of function during salt stress
  • 33.6 High performance computing in comparative genomics
  • 33.7 Conclusion
  • References
  • Section IV: Artificial intelligence and agribots
  • Chapter 34. Deep Learning applied to computational biology and agricultural sciences
  • Abstract
  • 34.1 Introduction
  • 34.2 Deep Learning and Convolutional Neural Network
  • 34.3 Deep Learning applications in computational biology
  • 34.4 Deep Learning applications in agricultural sciences
  • 34.5 Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 35. Image processing–based artificial intelligence system for rapid detection of plant diseases
  • Abstract
  • 35.1 Introduction
  • 35.2 Visual symptoms of diseases in plant
  • 35.3 Imaging
  • 35.4 Database creation
  • 35.5 Disease identification using feature extraction and classification
  • 35.6 Disease identification using convolutional neural network
  • 35.7 Determination of the accuracy of the system
  • 35.8 Severity estimation
  • 35.9 Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 36. Role of artificial intelligence, sensor technology, big data in agriculture: next-generation farming
  • Abstract
  • 36.1 Introduction
  • 36.2 Characteristics of big data
  • 36.3 Big data and smart agriculture
  • 36.4 Sources of big data
  • 36.5 Techniques and tool use in big data analysis
  • 36.6 Role of big data in agriculture ecosystem: for smart farming
  • Acknowledgments
  • Conflict of interest
  • Author contributions
  • References
  • Chapter 37. Artificial intelligence: a way forward for agricultural sciences
  • Abstract
  • 37.1 Introduction of artificial intelligence
  • 37.2 History of artificial intelligence
  • 37.3 Methods and approaches in artificial intelligence
  • 37.4 Technological advancements in artificial intelligence
  • 37.5 Application of artificial intelligence
  • 37.6 Future perspective and challenges
  • 37.7 Conclusion
  • References
  • Index

Product details

  • No. of pages: 706
  • Language: English
  • Copyright: © Academic Press 2022
  • Published: April 26, 2022
  • Imprint: Academic Press
  • Paperback ISBN: 9780323897785
  • eBook ISBN: 9780323885997

About the Editors

Pradeep Sharma

Dr. Pradeep Sharma received his Ph.D. from HAU Hisar. For his PhD thesis, he worked on cloning and characterization of phyto- viruses. He performed his Post-Doctoral Research (2006-2008) at Tohoku University, Japan with Prof M Ikegami as JSPS fellow, where he worked on Genome sequencing and RNA silencing. Also, Postdoctoral work at the ARO Volcani Center, Israel with Prof Y Gafni (2005-2006) nuclear import of genes using yeast one hybrid system, DST Scientist (2006), Visiting Scientist at South Dakota State University (2011) for allele mining and comparative genomics in rice and Oklahoma State University (2016) on small non- coding RNAs. In 2008, Dr Sharma joined the faculty in the Division of Crop Imrovement at ICAR- Indian Institute of Wheat and Barley Research, Karnal, India where he is Principal Scientist. He directs a research group studying the role of sRNAs and epigenetics for biotic and abiotic stresses, Bioinformatics and NGS based marker discovery in wheat. His group also decoded Karnal bunt genomes, development of SSR markers for population structure and diversity analysis of bunts and smut fungi, genome-wide analysis of TFs, drought and heat responsive microRNAs and transcriptomics. He teaches courses in Molecular Biology and computational Biology to graduate students. Dr Sharma published more than 120 national and international research papers, 25 invited chapters, and 10 scientific review articles; and edited eight books on Biotic and Abiotic stresses including RNAi technology. He has guided five students for Ph.D. in Biotechnology & Bioinformatrics as well as mentor for post-doctoral fellowships and DST-Women Scientist-A. Dr. Sharma was conferred the Young Scientist’s Award (biannual 2005–2006) of the National Academy of Agricultural Sciences and the Pran Vohra Award (2008–2009) of the Indian Science Congress Association, Fellow of National Academy of Biological Sciences (2015), Fellow of Indian Virological Society (2012), and Fellow Society for Advancement of Wheat and Barley Research (2019). He has worked at and visited many pioneering laboratories of the USA, the UK, Japan, France, China, the Netherlands, Indonesia, Turkey, and Israel

Affiliations and Expertise

Principle Scientist, 201A Crop Improvement Division, ICAR-Indian Institute of Wheat and Barley Research, Karnal, Haryana, India

Dinesh Yadav

Prof. Dinesh Yadav is Professor, Department of Biotechnology at D.D.U Gorakhpur University, Gorakhpur, INDIA. Presently he is a coordinator of newly established “Centre for Genomics and Bioinformatics “at D.D.U Gorakhpur University. He was Head, Department of Biotechnology, D.D.U. Gorakhpur University from August 2016 to August 2019. He is also serving as nodal officer IPR cell at DDU Gorakhpur University since Jan 2019. He has also served as Associate Professor in Department of Molecular Biology and Genetic Engineering at G.B Pant University of Agriculture and Technology, Pantnagar from 2006-2009. He has completed his Master Degree in Biotechnology from Devi Ahilya University, Indore in 1996 and Ph.D. from G.B. Pant University of Agriculture and Technology, Pantnagar in 2002. He has more than 19 years of teaching /research experiences. His areas of specialization are Molecular biology, Bioinformatics, Plant biotechnology and Enzyme technology. He has published more than 130 research papers including reviews, books, chapters in Books and proceedings in conferences and more than 230 GenBank accession numbers. He has guided 12 students for Ph.D. in Biotechnology and presently three students are pursuing PhD. He has been mentor for five post-doctoral fellowships namely UGC-Dr. D.S. Kothari (twice), DST-Women Scientist-A DST-Women Scientist-B and SERB-National PDF. He has also supervised 90 students for M.Sc. dissertation/short project work in Biotechnology. He has carried out projects from funding agencies like DBT, UGC, UP Council of Agricultural Research, Lucknow and DST. He has availed DST-BOYSCAST Fellowship at Australian Centre for Plant Functional Genomics (ACPFG), University of Adelaide, South Australia from 3rd May 2012-12th April 2013.He has been awarded Dr. Pushpendra Kumar Gupta Vishisht Krishi Vaigyanik Puraskar-2015 in the field of Agricultural Sciences by Uttar Pradesh Academy of Agricultural Sciences (UPAAS), Lucknow and Young Scientist Award-2008 by Uttarakhand Sate Council of Science & Technology in the discipline Biotechnology, Biochemistry and Microbiology. He is life member of scientific societies namely BRSI, Trivendrum, SBC(I), Bangalore, Indian Science Congress, Association, Calcutta, Society of Plant Biochemistry and Biotechnology, IARI, New Delhi, Association of Microbiologist of India (AMI), New Delhi and UPAAS, Lucknow. He has delivered more than 80 invited talks/ lectures in conference/symposium and also served as Mentor for DST-INSPIRE Science internship camp and Inspire-awards. Presently he is working on Plant specific transcription factor-DOF (DNA binding with One finger) and Nuclear Factor-Y (NF-Y) for developing biotic and abiotic stress tolerance crops and pectinases group of enzymes with potential applications in different industries. His research work has been published in National and International journals of repute like Journal of Experimental Botany, Planta, Theoretical and Applied Genetics, Process Biochemistry, Molecular Biology Reports, Plant Systematics and Evolution, Molecular Biotechnology, Applied Biochemistry and Biotechnology, Annals of Microbiology, Journal of Basic Microbiology, 3 Biotech, Biologia, Journal of Cereal Sciences, Physiology and Molecular Biology of Plants, Biochemistry (Moscow), Current Proteomics, Interdisciplinary Sciences: Computational Life Sciences, Biocatalysis and Agricultural Biotechnology, Cell Biochemistry and Biophysics, Online Journal of Bioinformatics, Chemistry and Ecology, African Journal of Biotechnology, Applied Biochemistry and Microbiology, SugarTech, Enzyme Research etc.

Affiliations and Expertise

Professor and Ex-Head, Dept. of Biotechnology, D.D.U. Gorakhpur University, Gorakhpur, Uttar Pradesh, India

R.K. Gaur

Prof. (Dr.) Rajarshi Kumar Gaur earned PhD in 2005, now Professor, Department of Biotechnology, Deen Dayal Upadhyaya Gorakhpur University, Gorakhpur, Uttar Pradesh, India. His Ph.D was on molecular characterization of sugarcane viruses, viz., mosaic, streak mosaic and yellow luteovirus. He received MASHAV fellowship of Israel government for his post-doctoral studies and joined The Volcani Centre, Israel and BenGurion University, Negev, Israel. In 2007 he received the Visiting Scientist Fellowship from Swedish Institute Fellowship, Sweden to work in the Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. Received Post-Doc. Fellowship from ICGEB, Italy in 2008. He has made significant contributions on plant viruses and published 130 national/international papers, authored 18 edited books and presented near about 50 papers in the national and international conferences. He has honoured as Fellow of Linnean Society, Fellow of Royal society of Biology, Fellow of Society of Plant Research. Fellow of Society of Applied Biology (FSAB), Fellow of International Society of Biotechnology (FISBT). He has bagged many other awards like, Prof. B.M. Johri memorial Award, Society of Plant Research (SPR), Excellent Teaching Award by Astha Foundation, Meerut, UGC-Research Teacher Award, Young Scientist Award-2012 in Biotechnology by Society of Plant Research (SPR), Meerut, Scientific & Applied Research Centre Gold Medal Award-2011 for outstanding contribution in the field of Biotechnology. He has visited several laboratories of USA, Canada, New Zealand, UK, Thailand, Sweden, Italy. He is also associated with several international journals as an academic editors and reviewers like Frontiers in Microbiology, Plose One, Scientific Reports, 3Biotech, J. of Plant Growth Regulators, Molecular Biology Report, Plant Disease, Current Genomic, Scientific African, Indian Phytopathology, VirusDisease etc. Currently, he is involved in many national & international grants and international collaborative projects on plant viruses and disease management.

Affiliations and Expertise

Department of Biotechnology, Gorakhpur University, India

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