Biofiber Reinforcements in Composite Materials - 1st Edition - ISBN: 9781782421221, 9781782421276

Biofiber Reinforcements in Composite Materials

1st Edition

Editors: Omar Faruk Mohini Sain
eBook ISBN: 9781782421276
Hardcover ISBN: 9781782421221
Imprint: Woodhead Publishing
Published Date: 5th September 2014
Page Count: 772
Tax/VAT will be calculated at check-out Price includes VAT (GST)
20% off
20% off
20% off
215.00
172.00
180.00
144.00
300.00
240.00
Unavailable
Price includes VAT (GST)
DRM-Free

Easy - Download and start reading immediately. There’s no activation process to access eBooks; all eBooks are fully searchable, and enabled for copying, pasting, and printing.

Flexible - Read on multiple operating systems and devices. Easily read eBooks on smart phones, computers, or any eBook readers, including Kindle.

Open - Buy once, receive and download all available eBook formats, including PDF, EPUB, and Mobi (for Kindle).

Institutional Access

Secure Checkout

Personal information is secured with SSL technology.

Free Shipping

Free global shipping
No minimum order.

Description

Natural fiber-reinforced composites have the potential to replace synthetic composites, leading to less expensive, stronger and more environmentally-friendly materials. This book provides a detailed review on how a broad range of biofibers can be used as reinforcements in composites and assesses their overall performance.

The book is divided into five major parts according to the origins of the different biofibers. Part I contains chapters on bast fibers, Part II; leaf fibers, Part III; seed fibers, Part IV; grass, reed and cane fibers, and finally Part V covers wood, cellulosic and other fibers including cellulosic nanofibers. Each chapter reviews a specific type of biofiber providing detailed information on the sources of each fiber, their cultivation, how to process and prepare them, and how to integrate them into composite materials. The chapters outline current and potential applications for each fiber and discuss their main strengths and weaknesses.

Key Features

  • The book is divided into five major parts according to the origins of the different biofibers - bast, leaf, seed; grass, reed and cane fibers, and finally wood, cellulosic and other fibers including cellulosic nanofibers.
  • This book provides a detailed review on how a broad range of biofibers can be used as reinforcements in composites and assesses their overall performance
  • The chapters outline current and potential applications for each fiber and discuss their main strengths and weaknesses

Readership

A comprehensive reference source that provides useful information for research and development managers working in industry, and also acts as a helpful resource for anyone undertaking academic research on polymer composites.

Table of Contents

  • Contributor contact details
  • Editor biographies
  • Woodhead Publishing Series in Composites Science and Engineering
  • Preface
  • Part I: Bast fibres
    • 1: The use of jute fibers as reinforcements in composites
      • Abstract
      • 1.1 Introduction
      • 1.2 Composition and properties of jute fibers
      • 1.3 Processing and properties of grafted jute fibers
      • 1.4 Processing and properties of alkali-treated jute fibers
      • 1.5 Characterization of jute fibers
      • 1.6 Manufacture of jute fiber composites
      • 1.7 Preparation and properties of irradiated jute composites
      • 1.8 Preparation and properties of oxidized jute composites
      • 1.9 Preparation and properties of mercerized jute composites
      • 1.10 Preparation and properties of jute composites modified by other processes
      • 1.11 Types and properties of hybrid jute composites
      • 1.12 Applications of jute composites
      • 1.13 Conclusion
    • 2: The use of flax fibres as reinforcements in composites
      • Abstract
      • 2.1 Introduction
      • 2.2 Key fibre properties
      • 2.3 Cultivation and quality issues
      • 2.4 Processing as a fibre reinforcement for composites
      • 2.5 Integration into the matrix
      • 2.6 Assessing the performance of the composites
      • 2.7 Applications
      • 2.8 Summary: strengths and weaknesses
      • 2.9 Future trends
      • 2.10 Sources of further information and advice
      • 2.11 Acknowledgements
    • 3: The use of hemp fibres as reinforcements in composites
      • Abstract
      • 3.1 Introduction
      • 3.2 Hemp fibre
      • 3.3 Key fibre properties
      • 3.4 Cultivation and quality issues
      • 3.5 Processing of hemp as fibre reinforcement for composites
      • 3.6 Surface modifications of hemp fibre and their effects on properties
      • 3.7 Fibre–matrix interaction
      • 3.8 Current applications of hemp fibres
      • 3.9 Future trends
      • 3.10 Summary
    • 4: The use of ramie fibers as reinforcements in composites
      • Abstract
      • 4.1 Introduction
      • 4.2 Ramie fiber properties
      • 4.3 Improving fiber/matrix interfacial bonding
      • 4.4 Ramie fiber-reinforced polymer composites
      • 4.5 Factors affecting composite mechanical properties
      • 4.6 Other studies of ramie fiber-reinforced composites
      • 4.7 Applications
      • 4.8 Conclusions
    • 5: The use of kenaf fibers as reinforcements in composites
      • Abstract
      • 5.1 Introduction
      • 5.2 Processing of kenaf fibers
      • 5.3 Matrices for kenaf fiber-reinforced composites
      • 5.4 Fabrication of kenaf fiber-reinforced composites (KFRC)
      • 5.5 Performance of KFRC
      • 5.6 Applications of KFRC
      • 5.7 Conclusion
  • Part II: Leaf fibres
    • 6: The use of sisal and henequen fibres as reinforcements in composites
      • Abstract
      • 6.1 Introduction
      • 6.2 The microstructures of sisal fibres
      • 6.3 The mechanical properties of sisal fibres
      • 6.4 Manufacture of sisal fibre-reinforced composites
      • 6.5 Mechanical properties of sisal fibre-reinforced composites: interfacial properties
      • 6.6 Mechanical properties of sisal fibre-reinforced composites: interlaminar fracture toughness
      • 6.7 Mechanical properties of unidirectional sisal fibre-reinforced composites
      • 6.8 Effect of fibre twist on the mechanical properties of sisal fibre-reinforced composites
      • 6.9 Durability of sisal fibre-reinforced composites: effects of moisture absorption
      • 6.10 Effects of ultraviolet (UV) light on the mechanical properties of sisal fibre-reinforced composites
      • 6.11 Applications of sisal fibre-reinforced composites
      • 6.12 Conclusion and future trends
      • 6.13 Acknowledgements
    • 7: The use of pineapple leaf fibers (PALFs) as reinforcements in composites
      • Abstract
      • 7.1 Introduction
      • 7.2 The pineapple plant
      • 7.3 Pineapple production
      • 7.4 Pineapple culture in Brazil and worldwide
      • 7.5 Fiber extraction
      • 7.6 Potential of fiber production plant
      • 7.7 Fiber properties
      • 7.8 Pineapple leaf fiber (PALF)-reinforced polymer composites
      • 7.9 Application of pineapple fibers and composites
      • 7.10 Conclusions
    • 8: The use of banana and abaca fibres as reinforcements in composites
      • Abstract
      • 8.1 Introduction
      • 8.2 Banana and abaca plants and their cultivation
      • 8.3 Fibre extraction
      • 8.4 Fibre structure and properties
      • 8.5 Disadvantages of banana and abaca fibres as reinforcement materials
      • 8.6 Surface modification of fibres
      • 8.7 Processing of banana/abaca fibre-reinforced composites
      • 8.8 Performance of banana/abaca fibre-reinforced thermoset polymer composites
      • 8.9 Performance of banana/abaca fibre-reinforced thermoplastic polymer composites
      • 8.10 Performance of banana/abaca fibre-reinforced biodegradable polymer composites
      • 8.11 Conclusions
    • 9: The use of palm leaf fibres as reinforcements in composites
      • Abstract
      • 9.1 Introduction
      • 9.2 Cultivation and uses of palm leaf fibres
      • 9.3 Properties of palm leaf fibres
      • 9.4 Surface modification of palm leaf fibres
      • 9.5 The use of palm leaf fibres as reinforcements in polymer nanocomposites
      • 9.6 Conclusion
  • Part III: Seed fibres
    • 10: The use of coir/coconut fibers as reinforcements in composites
      • Abstract
      • 10.1 Introduction
      • 10.2 The coconut plant and its cultivation
      • 10.3 Preparation/extraction of coir fibers from coconut husk
      • 10.4 Surface modification of coconut fibers
      • 10.5 The properties of coir fiber-reinforced thermoset polymer composites
      • 10.6 The properties of coir fiber-reinforced thermoplastic polymer composites
      • 10.7 Characterization of coconut/coir fiber-reinforced composites
      • 10.8 Advantages of using coconut/coir fibers as reinforcement in composites
      • 10.9 Conclusions
      • 10.10 Acknowledgment
    • 11: The use of cotton fibers as reinforcements in composites
      • Abstract
      • 11.1 Introduction
      • 11.2 Physical properties of cotton fibers
      • 11.3 Chemical and other properties of cotton fibers
      • 11.4 Cultivation of and quality issues affecting cotton fibers
      • 11.5 Processing of cotton fibers as reinforcements in composites
      • 11.6 Assessing the antibacterial activity of biomedical composites reinforced with composite cotton fibers
      • 11.7 Assessing the mechanical properties of biomedical and other composites reinforced with cotton fibers
      • 11.8 Summary
    • 12: The use of oil palm biomass (OPB) fibers as reinforcements in composites
      • Abstract
      • 12.1 Introduction
      • 12.2 Oil palm biomass fibers
      • 12.3 Surface modifications of empty fruit bunch (EFB) fibers
      • 12.4 Processing methods for EFB reinforced composites
      • 12.5 Effects of fiber treatments on the structures and properties of composites
      • 12.6 Applications of EFB fiber-based composites
      • 12.7 Conclusions
  • Part IV: Grass, reed and cane fibres
    • 13: The use of rice straw and husk fibers as reinforcements in composites
      • Abstract
      • 13.1 Introduction
      • 13.2 Cultivation and processing of rice straw and rice husk
      • 13.3 Key fiber properties
      • 13.4 Composite processing: surface treatment
      • 13.5 Critical issues for the integration of fibers into the matrix
      • 13.6 Processing of thermoset and thermoplastic composites incorporating rice straw/rice husk (RS/RH) fiber reinforcements
      • 13.7 Evaluating the performance of composites reinforced with RS/RH fibers
      • 13.8 Conclusion
    • 14: The use of wheat straw fibres as reinforcements in composites
      • Abstract
      • 14.1 Introduction
      • 14.2 Worldwide availability and economics
      • 14.3 Structure and composition of wheat straw
      • 14.4 Wheat straw as a polymer composite reinforcement
      • 14.5 Processing of wheat straw fibre-reinforced polymer composites
      • 14.6 Properties of wheat straw fibre-reinforced composites
      • 14.7 Potential applications of wheat straw fibre-reinforced composites
      • 14.8 Future trends
      • 14.9 Conclusions
    • 15: The use of maize, oat, barley and rye fibres as reinforcements in composites
      • Abstract
      • 15.1 Introduction
      • 15.2 Types of reinforcing fibre
      • 15.3 Fibre components and key properties
      • 15.4 Surface modification of fibres
      • 15.5 Processing and performance: maize and oat flour composites
      • 15.6 Processing and performance: barley and rye fibre composites
      • 15.7 Conclusion
    • 16: The use of bamboo fibres as reinforcements in composites
      • Abstract
      • 16.1 Introduction
      • 16.2 Structure of bamboo
      • 16.3 Chemical properties of bamboo
      • 16.4 Mechanical properties of bamboo
      • 16.5 Cultivation of bamboo, fibre extraction and surface modification
      • 16.6 Properties of bamboo fibre-reinforced polymer composites
      • 16.7 Applications of bamboo composites
      • 16.8 Sustainable and renewable products from bamboo composites
      • 16.9 Future trends
      • 16.10 Conclusions
    • 17: The use of sugarcane bagasse fibres as reinforcements in composites
      • Abstract
      • 17.1 Introduction
      • 17.2 Properties of sugarcane bagasse fibres
      • 17.3 Applications
      • 17.4 Surface treatment techniques
      • 17.5 Evaluation of fibre treatment techniques
      • 17.6 Assessing composite performance
      • 17.7 Future trends
      • 17.8 Conclusion
  • Part V: Wood, cellulosic and other fibres
    • 18: Isolation and application of cellulosic fibres in composites
      • Abstract
      • 18.1 Introduction
      • 18.2 Types of cellulosic fibre reinforcement and their properties
      • 18.3 Cultivation and fibre separation processes
      • 18.4 Fibre processing
      • 18.5 Assessing performance
      • 18.6 Applications
      • 18.7 Conclusions
      • 18.8 Sources of further information and advice
    • 19: The use of biobased nanofibres in composites
      • Abstract
      • 19.1 Introduction
      • 19.2 Biobased nanoreinforcements
      • 19.3 Ultrastructure of cellulose nanoreinforcements
      • 19.4 Source materials for cellulose nanoreinforcements
      • 19.5 Classification of cellulose nanoreinforcements
      • 19.6 Synthesis/isolation of cellulose nanoreinforcements
      • 19.7 Surface modification of cellulose nanoreinforcements
      • 19.8 Characterization of cellulose nanoreinforcements
      • 19.9 Matrices
      • 19.10 Incorporation of biobased nanoreinforcements into matrices
      • 19.11 Nanocomposites
      • 19.12 Challenges
      • 19.13 Future trends
      • 19.14 Conclusions
    • 20: The use of wood fibers as reinforcements in composites
      • Abstract
      • 20.1 Introduction: characteristics of wood
      • 20.2 Fiber processing and composite manufacturing
      • 20.3 Mechanical performance of wood plastic composites (WPCs)
      • 20.4 The effect of moisture on composite performance
      • 20.5 The effect of temperature on composite performance
      • 20.6 The effect of weathering on composite performance
      • 20.7 The effect of biological attack on composite performance
      • 20.8 Trends in materials and manufacturing techniques
      • 20.9 Current and emerging applications
    • 21: The use of Luffa cylindrica fibres as reinforcements in composites
      • Abstract
      • 21.1 Introduction
      • 21.2 Properties and surface treatment of Luffa cylindrica fibres
      • 21.3 Applications and performance of Luffa cylindrica fibres as reinforcements in composites
      • 21.4 Nanocomposites incorporating Luffa cylindrica fibres
      • 21.5 Conclusion
    • 22: The use of curaua fibers as reinforcements in composites
      • Abstract
      • 22.1 Introduction
      • 22.2 Curaua fibers
      • 22.3 Composites using curaua fibers
      • 22.4 Curaua nanofibers
      • 22.5 Nanocomposites with curaua fibers
      • 22.6 Conclusion
  • Index

Details

No. of pages:
772
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Woodhead Publishing 2015
Published:
Imprint:
Woodhead Publishing
eBook ISBN:
9781782421276
Hardcover ISBN:
9781782421221

About the Editor

Omar Faruk

Omar Faruk completed his B.S. and M.S. in Chemistry at the University of Chittagong, Bangladesh. With a DAAD (German Academic Exchange Service) scholarship, he joined at University of Kassel, Germany. He achieved his PhD in Mechanical Engineering at 2005. He worked at the Department of Forestry, Michigan State University, USA as a Visiting Research Associate from 2006 to 2009. Since 2010, he is working at the Centre for Biocomposites and Biomaterials Processing, University of Toronto, Canada.

Affiliations and Expertise

University of Toronto, Canada

Mohini Sain

Mohini Sain is Professor and Director of the Centre for Biocomposites and Biomaterials Processing at the University of Toronto, and the Dean of the Faculty of Forestry.Sain was the recipient of one of the 2001 Industry-University Synergy Awards and the Society of Plastics Engineers award for Significant Industrial Contribution in 2002.

Affiliations and Expertise

University of Toronto, Canada