Bark Beetle Management, Ecology, and Climate Change

Bark Beetle Management, Ecology, and Climate Change

1st Edition - October 28, 2021

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  • Editors: Kamal Gandhi, Richard Hofstetter
  • eBook ISBN: 9780128224403
  • Hardcover ISBN: 9780128221457

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Description

Bark Beetle Management, Ecology, and Climate Change provides the most updated and comprehensive knowledge on the complex effects of global warming upon the economically and ecologically important bark beetle species and their host trees. This authoritative reference synthesizes information on how forest disturbances and environmental changes due to current and future climate changes alter the ecology and management of bark beetles in forested landscapes. Written by international experts on bark beetle ecology, this book covers topics ranging from changes in bark beetle distributions and addition of novel hosts due to climate change, interactions of insects with altered host physiology and disturbance regimes, ecosystem-level impacts of bark beetle outbreaks due to climate change, multi-trophic changes mediated via climate change, and management of bark beetles in altered forests and climate conditions. Bark Beetle Management, Ecology, and Climate Change is an important resource for entomologists, as well as forest health specialists, policy makers, and conservationists who are interested in multi-faceted impacts of climate change on forest insects at the organismal, population, and community-levels.

Key Features

  • The only book that addresses the impacts of global warming on bark beetles with feedback loops to forest patterns and processes
  • Discusses altered disturbance regimes due to climate change with implications for bark beetles and associated organisms
  • Led by a team of editors whose expertise includes entomology, pathology, ecology, forestry, modeling, and tree physiology

Readership

Bark Beetle Management, Ecology, and Climate Change is an important resource for entomologists, as well as forest health specialists, policy makers, and conservationists who are interested in multi-faceted impacts of climate change on forest insects at the organismal, population, and community-levels.

Table of Contents

  • Cover image
  • Title page
  • Table of Contents
  • Copyright
  • Dedication
  • Contributors
  • Introduction: Bark beetles, management, and climate change
  • Abstract
  • 1: Background
  • 2: Goals of the book
  • References
  • Acknowledgments
  • Part I: Insect distributions and novel hosts
  • 1: Climate change and invasions by nonnative bark and ambrosia beetles
  • Abstract
  • Acknowledgments
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Key terms and concepts
  • 3: Factors predisposing bark and ambrosia beetles as invaders
  • 4: Transportation and arrival
  • 5: Establishment and population growth
  • 6: Spread of established populations
  • 7: Impact of climate change on fungal associates
  • 8: Consequences of extreme weather events on invasions
  • 9: Conclusions and future directions
  • References
  • 2: Complexities in predicting mountain pine beetle and spruce beetle response to climate change
  • Abstract
  • Acknowledgments
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Development rates and thresholds
  • 3: Diapause
  • 4: Cold hardening
  • 5: Potential climate change effects on population persistence and expansion
  • 6: Management implications of climate change-affected population dynamics
  • 7: Conclusions
  • References
  • 3: Responses and modeling of southern pine beetle and its host pines to climate change
  • Abstract
  • Acknowledgments
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Factors influencing the geographic range of southern pine beetle
  • 3: Management and monitoring data
  • 4: Climate change, range expansion, and predictive modeling of southern pine beetle distribution
  • 5: Conclusions
  • References
  • Part II: Interactions of insects with altered host physiology
  • 4: The Eurasian spruce bark beetle in a warming climate: Phenology, behavior, and biotic interactions
  • Abstract
  • Acknowledgments
  • 1: Ips typographus—destructive force and keystone species in Eurasian spruce forests
  • 2: Temperature effects on spruce bark beetle phenology and population dynamics
  • 3: Beetle exploration of landscape and habitat—How climatic conditions and odor sources influence dispersal and host selection
  • 4: Carbon castles: The formidable defenses of Norway spruce
  • 5: Are (drought) stressed spruce trees more susceptible to Ips typographus attack?
  • 6: The tripartite Norway spruce, Ips typographus, and fungal symbionts system
  • 7: Bark beetle–Norway spruce interactions in a changing climate—Perspectives for science and management
  • References
  • 5: Climate change alters host tree physiology and drives plant-insect interactions in forests of the southwestern United States of America
  • Abstract
  • Acknowledgments
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Impacts of climate drivers on plant-insect interactions in southwestern USA forest ecosystems
  • 3: What are the gaps in our understanding of plant-insect interactions under climate change in southwestern forests?
  • 4: Conclusions
  • References
  • 6: Relationships between drought, coniferous tree physiology, and Ips bark beetles under climatic changes
  • Abstract
  • Acknowledgments
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Results from literature linking Ips bark beetle outbreaks and drought
  • 3: Economic and ecological consequences of drought and Ips beetle outbreaks on conifers
  • 4: Anticipated changes in conifer physiology due to climate change
  • 5: Insect-plant interactions in host trees experiencing drought stress
  • 6: Ips-drought interactions: A conceptual framework
  • 7: Research gaps
  • 8: Conclusions and future research directions
  • References
  • Part III: Interactions of insects with altered disturbance regimes
  • 7: Interactions between catastrophic wind disturbances and bark beetles in forested ecosystems
  • Abstract
  • Acknowledgments
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Interactions of wind disturbance with bark beetles
  • 3: Postwindstorm forest management practices
  • 4: Conceptual model of cross-scale interactions between windthrow and bark beetles
  • 5: Conclusions
  • References
  • Part IV: Ecosystem-level impacts of bark beetle outbreaks due to climate change
  • 8: Bark beetle outbreaks alter biotic components of forested ecosystems
  • Abstract
  • Acknowledgments
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Changes to the abiotic forest environment
  • 3: Changes to forest structure by bark beetle outbreaks
  • 4: Responses of flora following bark beetle outbreaks
  • 5: Responses of fauna following bark beetle outbreaks
  • 6: Responses of soil microbiota following bark beetle outbreaks
  • 7: Conclusions
  • References
  • 9: Eastern larch beetle, a changing climate, and impacts to northern tamarack forests
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Host species
  • 3: Predisposing factors associated with tree-killing activity of eastern larch beetles
  • 4: Biology and ecology of eastern larch beetle
  • 5: Shifts to bivoltine development in a warming climate
  • 6: The impact of eastern larch beetle outbreaks on forests
  • 7: Silvicultural systems of eastern larch
  • 8: Future research needs
  • References
  • Part V: Multitrophic changes mediated via climate change
  • 10: Effects of rising temperatures on ectosymbiotic communities associated with bark and ambrosia beetles
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Functions and interactions of ectosymbionts within beetle-infested trees
  • 3: Ectosymbiotic communities and their relationship with climate variables
  • 4: Direct effects of temperature of ectosymbionts
  • 5: Effects of climate change on tree condition (secondary defenses, nutrition, moisture) and the symbiotic community
  • 6: Projected effects of climate (temperature regimes, drought) and changes to the ectosymbiotic community on bark beetle ecology
  • 7: Conceptual model
  • 8: Testable hypotheses
  • 9: Critical research needs
  • References
  • Part VI: Management of bark beetles in altered forests and climate conditions
  • 11: Management tactics to reduce bark beetle impacts in North America and Europe under altered forest and climatic conditions
  • Abstract
  • Acknowledgments
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Development of outbreaks
  • 3: Detection, survey, and risk and hazard rating models
  • 4: Suppression
  • 5: Sanitation
  • 6: Insecticides
  • 7: Semiochemicals
  • 8: Prevention
  • 9: Case study 1—Dendroctonus spp. in yellow pine forests in the western United States: Changes in forest structure and composition from fire suppression, livestock grazing, and climatic changes increase host-tree susceptibility
  • 10: Case study 2—Dendroctonus ponderosae in pine forests in western North America: Climatic changes increase beetle overwintering survival and host susceptibility
  • 11: Case study 3—Dendroctonus rufipennis in spruce forests in western North America: Climatic changes increase beetle voltinism and host susceptibility
  • 12: Case study 4—Dendroctonus frontalis in pine forests in the eastern United States: A native bark beetle goes invasive
  • 13: Case study 5—Ips acuminatus in Pinus sylvestris forests in central Europe: Climatic changes increase host susceptibility and create a “new” forest insect pest
  • 14: Case study 6—Ips typographus in Picea abies forests in central Europe: Climatic changes and the legacy of off-site plantings increase forest susceptibility
  • 15: Conclusions
  • References
  • 12: Interactions among climate, disturbance, and bark beetles affect forest landscapes of the future
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Forest management
  • 3: Ten research needs and gaps
  • References
  • Index

Product details

  • No. of pages: 438
  • Language: English
  • Copyright: © Academic Press 2021
  • Published: October 28, 2021
  • Imprint: Academic Press
  • eBook ISBN: 9780128224403
  • Hardcover ISBN: 9780128221457

About the Editors

Kamal Gandhi

Kamal J.K. Gandhi is a Professor of Forest Entomology at the University of Georgia in Athens, Georgia. She is also the director of the Southern Pine Health Research Cooperative. She has published extensively on the population, community, and chemical ecology of bark beetles particularly under disturbance regimes in diverse ecosystem-types.

Affiliations and Expertise

Professor of Forest Entomology, University of Georgia, Georgia, USA

Richard Hofstetter

Richard Hofstetter is a Professor of Forest Entomology in the School of Forestry at Northern Arizona University in Flagstaff, Arizona. He has published extensively on bark beetle biology, symbioses, communication and host tree interactions, and is the coauthor of Bark Beetles: Biology and Ecology of Native and Invasive Species (Academic Press, 2015).

Affiliations and Expertise

Professor of Forest Entomology, School of Forestry, Northern Arizona University, Arizona, USA

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