Apoptosis and Development - 1st Edition - ISBN: 9780124104259, 9780124095984

Apoptosis and Development, Volume 114

1st Edition

Serial Volume Editors: Hermann Steller
eBook ISBN: 9780124095984
Hardcover ISBN: 9780124104259
Imprint: Academic Press
Published Date: 5th October 2015
Page Count: 388
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Table of Contents

  • Preface
  • Chapter One: Cell Death in C. elegans Development
    • Abstract
    • 1 Introduction
    • 2 Core Apoptosis Regulators in C. elegans
    • 3 The Core Apoptotic Pathway of C. elegans
    • 4 Regulating Apoptosis
    • 5 The Engulfment Genes and Their Roles in Cell Death
    • 6 Linker Cell Death
    • 7 Looking Ahead
    • Acknowledgments
  • Chapter Two: Mitochondrial Cell Death Pathways in Caenorhabiditis elegans
    • Abstract
    • 1 Introduction
    • 2 Mitochondria: A Central Player in Mammalian Apoptosis
    • 3 Programmed Cell Death in C. elegans
    • 4 Mitochondrion Is an Important Component in C. elegans Programmed Cell Death
    • 5 Concluding Remarks
    • Acknowledgments
  • Chapter Three: Autophagy in Cell Life and Cell Death
    • Abstract
    • 1 Introduction
    • 2 Autophagy Genes
    • 3 Autophagy and Cell Survival
    • 4 Autophagy and Cell Death
    • 5 Conclusions
    • Acknowledgments
  • Chapter Four: The End of the Beginning: Cell Death in the Germline
    • Abstract
    • 1 Overview of Cell Death Pathways
    • 2 Death of Primordial Germ Cells
    • 3 Germline Cell Death in the Adult Ovary
    • 4 Cell Death in the Testis
    • 5 Comparison of PCD in the Drosophila and Mammalian Ovary
    • 6 Conclusion
    • Acknowledgements
  • Chapter Five: The HOX–Apoptosis Regulatory Interplay in Development and Disease
    • Abstract
    • 1 Introduction
    • 2 Hox Genes: Homeotic Genes with Master Regulatory Functions
    • 3 Apoptosis: The Controlled Killing of Cells
    • 4 Hox–Apoptosis Regulatory Interactions During Development
    • 5 Interplay of Hox Genes and Apoptosis in the Disease Context
    • 6 Concluding Remarks
    • Acknowledgments
  • Chapter Six: Programmed Cell Death and Caspase Functions During Neural Development
    • Abstract
    • 1 Introduction
    • 2 Neurotrophic Support for Neuronal or Glial Survival
    • 3 Involvement in Morphogenesis
    • 4 Elimination of Morphogen-Producing Cells
    • 5 Intrinsic Regulation of the Number of Progeny from a Specific Cell Lineage
    • 6 Canceling Developmental Errors
    • 7 Neural Cell Death in Sensory System Development: The Visual System as a Model
    • 8 The Role of Neural Cell Death in Tissue Remodeling
    • 9 Glial Function in Controlling Neural Architecture by Elimination of Dead Cells
    • 10 The Nonapoptotic Functions of Caspases in Neural Development
    • 11 Neurite Pruning
    • 12 Mechanisms that Control Nonapoptotic Caspase Activation
    • 13 Transient or Weak Caspase Activation
    • 14 Local Caspase Activation
    • 15 Conclusion
    • Acknowledgments
  • Chapter Seven: Regulation of Cell Death by IAPs and Their Antagonists
    • Abstract
    • 1 Introduction
    • 2 IAP/Antagonist Interaction
    • 3 Mitochondrial Association of IAP-Antagonists
    • 4 The Role of Mammalian IAP-Antagonists
    • 5 Transcriptional Regulation of Drosophila IAP-Antagonists
    • 6 Posttranscriptional Regulation of IAP-Antagonists
    • 7 The Role of IAP-Antagonists in Nervous System Development
    • 8 IAPs and Their Antagonists in Sculpting Morphogenesis
    • 9 Nonapoptotic Roles of IAPs in Morphogenesis, Cell Migration, and Proliferation
    • 10 The Roles of IAPs in the Innate Immune Response
    • 11 Concluding Remarks
    • Acknowledgments
  • Chapter Eight: Ubiquitin-Mediated Regulation of Cell Death, Inflammation, and Defense of Homeostasis
    • Abstract
    • 1 Introduction
    • 2 Ubiquitin as Mediator of Signaling Events
    • 3 Ub as Arbiter of Life and Death—TNF Signaling as Paradigm
    • 4 Ub-Dependent Regulation of RIPK1 and the Ripoptosome
    • 5 IAP-Mediated Regulation of Caspases
    • 6 Concluding Remarks
    • Acknowledgments
  • Chapter Nine: The Sound of Silence: Signaling by Apoptotic Cells
    • Abstract
    • 1 Apoptosis: A Silent Death?
    • 2 Apoptotic Signals Dictate Immunological Responses to Cell Death
    • 3 Apoptotic Cells Directly Influence Tissue Homeostasis and Growth Control
    • 4 Apoptosis: A Loud Death
    • Acknowledgments
  • Chapter Ten: Clearance of Apoptotic Cells and Pyrenocytes
    • Abstract
    • 1 Introduction
    • 2 Apoptosis and Signal Transduction
    • 3 The Engulfment of Apoptotic Cells
    • 4 The Engulfment of Pyrenocytes
    • 5 DNA Degradation in Macrophages
    • 6 Perspectives
  • Chapter Eleven: Apoptotic Cell Clearance in Development
    • Abstract
    • 1 Introduction
    • 2 Professional and Nonprofessional Phagocytes During Development
    • 3 How Do Phagocytes “Sense” Apoptotic Cells?
    • 4 How Do Phagocytes Recognize Apoptotic Cells?
    • 5 Intracellular Phagocytic Machinery
    • 6 How Do Phagocytes Become Phagocytic?
    • 7 Why Are Living Cells Not Removed by Phagocytes?
    • 8 Glial Phagocytosis of Apoptotic Neurons in the Developing CNS
    • 9 Additional Examples of Apoptotic Cell Clearance During Development
    • 10 Stress-Induced Upregulation of Phagocytosis During Development
    • 11 Anti-Inflammatory Response Following Apoptotic Cell Clearance
    • 12 Phagocytosis-Promoted PCD
    • 13 Concluding Remarks
    • Acknowledgments
  • Chapter Twelve: The Morphogenetic Role of Apoptosis
    • Abstract
    • 1 Introduction
    • 2 Part I: Cytoskeletal Control of Apoptotic Cell Dynamics
    • 3 Part II: Influence of Apoptotic Cells on Their Surroundings
    • 4 Conclusion
  • Index

Description

Apoptosis and Development, the latest volume of Current Topics in Developmental Biology continues the legacy of this premier serial with quality chapters authored by leaders in the field.

This volume covers research methods in apoptosis and development, and includes sections on such topics as the non-lethal role of apoptotic proteins and germ line cell death in Drosophila.

Key Features

  • Continues the legacy of this premier serial with quality chapters authored by leaders in the field
  • Includes descriptions of the most recent advances in the field
  • Covers research methods in apoptosis and development, and includes sections on such topics as the non-lethal role of apoptotic proteins and germ line cell death in Drosophila

Readership

Graduate students in developmental and cell biology; established nonexpert scientists in these fields who aim to get both a conceptual overview of new developments in the area and an up-to-date review of the literature.


Details

No. of pages:
388
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Academic Press 2015
Published:
Imprint:
Academic Press
eBook ISBN:
9780124095984
Hardcover ISBN:
9780124104259

Reviews

Praise for the Series:
"Outstanding both in variety and in the quality of its contributions." --Nature


About the Serial Volume Editors

Hermann Steller Serial Volume Editor

Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Strang Laboratory of Apoptosis and Cancer Biology, The Rockefeller University, USA

Affiliations and Expertise

Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Strang Laboratory of Apoptosis and Cancer Biology, The Rockefeller University, USA