Anti-Abrasive Nanocoatings - 1st Edition - ISBN: 9780857092113, 9780857092175

Anti-Abrasive Nanocoatings

1st Edition

Current and Future Applications

Authors: M Aliofkhazraei
eBook ISBN: 9780857092175
Hardcover ISBN: 9780857092113
Imprint: Woodhead Publishing
Published Date: 9th December 2014
Page Count: 628
Tax/VAT will be calculated at check-out Price includes VAT (GST)
30% off
30% off
30% off
30% off
30% off
20% off
20% off
30% off
30% off
30% off
30% off
30% off
20% off
20% off
30% off
30% off
30% off
30% off
30% off
20% off
20% off
210.00
147.00
147.00
147.00
147.00
147.00
168.00
168.00
155.00
108.50
108.50
108.50
108.50
108.50
124.00
124.00
125.00
87.50
87.50
87.50
87.50
87.50
100.00
100.00
Unavailable
Price includes VAT (GST)
DRM-Free

Easy - Download and start reading immediately. There’s no activation process to access eBooks; all eBooks are fully searchable, and enabled for copying, pasting, and printing.

Flexible - Read on multiple operating systems and devices. Easily read eBooks on smart phones, computers, or any eBook readers, including Kindle.

Open - Buy once, receive and download all available eBook formats, including PDF, EPUB, and Mobi (for Kindle).

Institutional Access

Secure Checkout

Personal information is secured with SSL technology.

Free Shipping

Free global shipping
No minimum order.

Description

This book provides an overview of the fabrication methods for anti-abrasive nanocoatings. The connections among fabrication parameters, the characteristics of nanocoatings and the resulting properties (i.e. nanohardness, toughness, wear rate, load-bearing ability, friction coefficient, and scratch resistance) are discussed. Size-affected mechanical properties of nanocoatings are examined, including their uses. Anti-abrasive nanocoatings, including metallic-, ceramic-, and polymeric-based layers, as well as different kinds of nanostructures, such as multi-layered nanocomposites and thin films, are reviewed.

Key Features

  • Provides a comprehensive overview of the fabrication methods for anti-abrasive nanocoatings
  • Discusses the connections among fabrication parameters, the characteristics of nanocoatings and the resulting properties
  • Reviews advantages and drawbacks of fabrication methods for anti-abrasive nanocoatings and clarifies the place of these nanocoatings in the world of nanotechnology

Readership

Students, Researchers and Professionals studying engineering and surface materials

Table of Contents

  • List of figures
  • List of tables
  • About the editor
  • About the contributors
  • Preface
  • Part One
    • 1. Wear, friction and prevention of tribo-surfaces by coatings/nanocoatings
      • 1.1 Introduction
      • 1.2 Friction of materials
      • 1.3 Wear in metals, alloys and composites
      • 1.4 Materials and their selection for wear and friction applications
      • 1.5 Coatings/nanocoatings and surface treatments
      • 1.6 Conclusion
      • Acknowledgements
      • References
    • 2. An investigation into the tribological property of coatings on micro- and nanoscale
      • 2.1 Drivers of studying the origin of tribology behavior
      • 2.2 Contact at nanometer scale
      • 2.3 Atomic friction with zero separation
      • 2.4 Scratching wear at atomic scale
      • 2.5 Conclusion
      • References
    • 3. Stress on anti-abrasive performance of sol-gel derived nanocoatings
      • 3.1 Classical curvature stress for thin films on plate substrates
      • 3.2 Thermal stress of thin films
      • 3.3 Why do drying films crack?
      • 3.4 Cracks by stress come from constraint of shrinkage by the substrate
      • 3.5 Rapid sol-gel fabrication to confront tensile trailing cracks
      • 3.6 Anti-abrasive SiO2 film in application: self-assembling covalently bonded nanocoating
      • 3.7 Abrasive test
      • 3.8 Anti-abrasive performance of sol-gel nanocoatings
      • 3.9 Conclusion
      • Acknowledgments
      • References
    • 4. Self-cleaning glass
      • 4.1 Introduction
      • 4.2 History of glass
      • 4.3 Self-cleaning glass
      • 4.4 Hydrophilic coating
      • 4.5 Anti-reflective coating
      • 4.6 Porous materials
      • 4.7 Photocatalytic activity of TiO2
      • 4.8 Hydrophobic coatings
      • 4.9 Fabrication of self-cleaning glass
      • 4.10 Application of self-cleaning glasses
      • Acknowledgements
      • References
    • 5. Sol-gel nanocomposite hard coatings
      • 5.1 Introduction
      • 5.2 Sol-gel nanocomposite hard coatings
      • 5.3 Mechanical property studies of sol-gel hard coatings on various substrates
      • 5.4 Possible applications of hard coatings
      • 5.5 Summary
      • Acknowledgments
      • References
    • 6. Process considerations for nanostructured coatings
      • 6.1 Overview
      • 6.2 Anti-reflection coatings
      • 6.3 Fluidized bed method
      • 6.4 Electroplating
      • 6.5 Nanografting
      • 6.6 Plasma spray coating
      • 6.7 Nanostructuring in thin films
      • 6.8 Electrochemical deposition
      • 6.9 Anti-corrosion coating
      • 6.10 Infrared transparent electromagnetic shielding
      • 6.11 Underlying science – self-assembly
      • 6.12 Conclusions
      • References
  • Part Two
    • 7. Nanostructured electroless nickel-boron coatings for wear resistance
      • 7.1 Introduction
      • 7.2 Synthesis of electroless nickel-boron coatings
      • 7.3 Morphology and structure of electroless nickel-boron coatings
      • 7.4 Mechanical and wear properties of nanocrystalline electroless nickel-boron coatings
      • 7.5 Corrosion resistance
      • 7.6 Conclusion
      • References
    • 8. Wear resistance of nanocomposite coatings
      • 8.1 Introduction
      • 8.2 Materials and methods
      • 8.3 Results and discussion
      • 8.4 Conclusions
      • Acknowledgments
      • References
    • 9. Machining medical grade titanium alloys using nonabrasive nanolayered cutting tools
      • 9.1 Metallurgical Aspects
      • 9.2 Machining of titanium alloys
      • 9.3 Machining with coated cutting tools: a case study
      • 9.4 Conclusions
      • Acknowledgments
      • References
    • 10. Functional nanostructured coatings via layer-by-layer self-assembly
      • 10.1 Introduction
      • 10.2 LbL process
      • 10.3 LbL-deposited nanostructured coatings with different functions
      • 10.4 Conclusions
      • Acknowledgment
      • References
    • 11. Theoretical study on an influence of fabrication parameters on the quality of smart nanomaterials
      • 11.1 Introduction
      • 11.2 Literature survey on VO2
      • 11.3 Synthesis techniques description
      • 11.4 Conclusion
      • References
    • 12. Formation of dense nanostructured coatings by microarc oxidation method
      • 12.1 Introduction
      • 12.2 Phenomena of MAO-coating formation
      • 12.3 Voltage–current characteristics
      • 12.4 Discussion about growth mechanism of MAO coating
      • 12.5 Model of fractal growth of the dense wear-resistant layer
      • 12.6 Macro- and microstructure of MAO coatings
      • 12.7 Wear-resistant properties
      • 12.8 Conclusion
      • References
    • 13. Current trends in molecular functional monolayers
      • 13.1 Introduction
      • 13.2 Steps for self-assembly
      • 13.3 Mechanism
      • 13.4 Characterization of SAMs
      • 13.5 Use of SAMs for various applications
      • 13.6 Self-assembled monolayers on gold substrates
      • 13.7 Si-C monolayer formation and C-C bonding
      • 13.8 Supramolecular assembly on surface–host-guest interactions and other non-covalent bonding
      • 13.9 Self-assembled monolayers on other surfaces such as titania nanotubes
      • 13.10 Chemical and electrical biosensors
      • 13.11 Quality improvement
      • 13.12 Conclusions
      • References
    • 14. Surface engineered nanostructures on metallic biomedical materials for anti-abrasion
      • 14.1 Introduction
      • 14.2 Surface technologies on metallic biomedical materials for anti-abrasion
      • 14.3 Future prospects
      • References
    • 15. Theoretical modeling of friction and wear processes at atomic level
      • 15.1 Introduction
      • 15.2 MD method
      • 15.3 Quantum chemistry methods
      • 15.4 Basic types of problems
      • 15.5 Lubrication and one-electron transfers
      • 15.6 Conclusion
      • References
    • 16. Mechanical characterization of thin films by depth-sensing indentation
      • 16.1 Introduction
      • 16.2 Hardness
      • 16.3 Young’s modulus
      • 16.4 Conclusion
      • Acknowledgements
      • References
  • Part Three
    • 17. Advanced bulk and thin film materials for harsh environment MEMS applications
      • 17.1 Introduction
      • 17.2 Piezoelectric substrates
      • 17.3 Non-piezoelectric substrates
      • 17.4 Thin piezoelectric films
      • 17.5 Metal electrodes
      • 17.6 Conclusion
      • References
    • 18. Plasma-assisted techniques for growing hard nanostructured coatings: An overview
      • 18.1 Introduction
      • 18.2 Hard nanocoatings: from history to designs and properties
      • 18.3 Main plasma-based techniques for synthesis of hard nanocoatings
      • 18.4 Conclusion
      • Acknowledgments
      • References
    • 19. Thermal spray nanostructured ceramic and metal-matrix composite coatings
      • 19.1 Introduction
      • 19.2 Nanostructured feedstock
      • 19.3 Nanostructured coatings
      • 19.4 Proven applications
      • 19.5 Possible future applications
      • 19.6 Summary
      • Acknowledgements
      • References
    • 20. Thermally sprayed nanostructured coatings for anti-wear and TBC applications: State-of-the-art and future perspectives
      • 20.1 Introduction
      • 20.2 Thermal spraying processes
      • 20.3 Typical nanostructured coatings for technological applications
      • 20.4 Conclusion
      • References
    • 21. Hard thin films: Applications and challenges
      • 21.1 Introduction
      • 21.2 Characterization of thin films
      • 21.3 Challenges
      • 21.4 Summary
      • References
  • Index

Details

No. of pages:
628
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Woodhead Publishing 2015
Published:
Imprint:
Woodhead Publishing
eBook ISBN:
9780857092175
Hardcover ISBN:
9780857092113

About the Author

M Aliofkhazraei

Mahmood Aliofkhazraei is a PhD researcher in the Corrosion and Surface Engineering Group at the Tarbiat Modares University in Tehran, Iran. Having obtained his academic degrees from this university, his research has focussed on different aspects of nanocoatings. He is the author of over 50 scientific publications on nanocoatings and has received numerous scientific awards, including the Khwarizmi Award. In 2010, he was selected as the best young nanotechnologist nationwide. Mahmood is also a member of the National Association of Surface Sciences, Iranian Corrosion Association and the National Elite Foundation of Iran.

Affiliations and Expertise

Department of Materials Engineering, Tarbiat Modares University, Iran