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Advances in Thermal Energy Storage Systems - 2nd Edition - ISBN: 9780128198858

Advances in Thermal Energy Storage Systems

2nd Edition

Methods and Applications

Editor: Luisa F. Cabeza
Hardcover ISBN: 9780128198858
Imprint: Woodhead Publishing
Published Date: 30th October 2020
Page Count: 796
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Table of Contents

NB: text in red indicates level of edit &/ new content

1: Introduction to thermal energy storage (TES) systems – Minor revision

Abstract

1.1 Introduction

1.2 Basic thermodynamics of energy storage

1.3 Overview of system types

1.4 Environmental impact and energy savings produced

1.5 Conclusions

Acknowledgements

Part One: Sensible heat storage systems

2: Using water for heat storage in thermal energy storage (TES) systems – Minor revision (author did not answer to query, might need to be changed).

Abstract

2.1 Introduction

2.2 Principles of sensible heat storage systems involving water

2.3 Advances in the use of water for heat storage

2.4 Future trends

3: Using molten salts and other liquid sensible storage media in thermal energy storage (TES) systems – Major revision

Abstract

3.1 Introduction

3.2 Principles of heat storage systems using molten salts and other liquid sensible storage media

3.3 Advances in molten salts storage

3.4 Advances in other liquid sensible storage media

3.5 Future trends

Acknowledgements

4: Using concrete and other solid storage media in thermal energy storage (TES) systems – Minor revision

Abstract

4.1 Introduction

4.2 Principles of heat storage in solid media

4.3 State-of-the-art regenerator-type storage

4.4 Advances in the use of solid storage media for heat storage

5: The use of aquifers as thermal energy storage (TES) systems – Minor or no revision (authors did not answer to query, might need to be changed).

Abstract

5.1 Introduction

5.2 Thermal sources

5.3 Aquifier thermal energy storage (ATES)

5.4 Thermal and geophysical aspects

5.5 ATES design

5.6 ATES cooling only case study: Richard Stockton College of New Jersey

5.7 ATES district heating and cooling with heat pumps case study: Eindhoven University of Technology

5.8 ATES heating and cooling with de-icing case study: ATES plant at Stockholm Arlanda Airport

5.9 Conclusion

Acknowledgements

6: The use of borehole thermal energy storage (BTES) systems – Minor or no revision (author did not answer to query, might need to be changed).

Abstract

6.1 Introduction

6.2 System integration of borehole thermal energy storage (BTES)

6.3 Investigation and design of BTES construction sites

6.4 Construction of borehole heat exchangers (BHEs) and BTES

6.5 Examples of BTES

6.6 Conclusion and future trends

7: Analysis, modeling and simulation of underground thermal energy storage (UTES) systems – No update needed

Abstract

7.1 Introduction

7.2 Aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) system

7.3 Borehole thermal energy storage (BTES) system

7.4 FEFLOW as a tool for simulating underground thermal energy storage (UTES)

7.5 Applications

Appendix: Nomenclature

Part Two: Latent heat storage systems

8: Using ice and snow in thermal energy storage systems – No update needed

Abstract

8.1 Introduction

8.2 Principles of thermal energy storage systems using snow and ice

8.3 Design and implementation of thermal energy storage using snow

8.4 Full-scale applications

8.5 Future trends

9: Using solid-liquid phase change materials (PCMs) in thermal energy storage systems – Major revision

Abstract

9.1 Introduction

9.2 Principles of solid-liquid phase change materials (PCMs)

9.3 Shortcomings of PCMs in thermal energy storage systems

9.4 Methods to determine the latent heat capacity of PCMs

9.5 Methods to determine other physical and technical properties of PCMs

9.6 Comparison of physical and technical properties of key PCMs

9.7 Future trends

10: Microencapsulation of phase change materials (PCMs) for thermal energy storage systems – Minor revision

Abstract

10.1 Introduction

10.2 Microencapsulation of phase change materials (PCMs)

10.3 Shape-stabilized PCMs

11: Design of latent heat storage systems using phase change materials (PCMs) - Minor or no revision (authors did not answer to query, might need to be changed)

Abstract

11.1 Introduction

11.2 Requirements and considerations for the design

11.3 Design methodologies

11.4 Applications of latent heat storage systems incorporating PCMs

11.5 Future trends

12: Modelling of heat transfer in phase change materials (PCMs) for thermal energy storage systems – Minor revision

Abstract

12.1 Introduction

12.2 Inherent physical phenomena in phase change materials (PCMs)

12.3 Modelling methods and approaches for the simulation of heat transfer in PCMs for thermal energy storage

12.4 Examples of modelling applications

12.5 Future trends

13: Integrating phase change materials (PCMs) in thermal energy storage systems for buildings – Major revision

Abstract

13.1 Introduction

13.2 Integration of phase change materials (PCMs) into the building envelope: physical considerations and heuristic arguments

13.3 Organic and inorganic PCMs used in building walls

13.4 PCM containment

13.5 Measurement of the thermal properties of PCM and PCM integrated in building walls

13.6 Experimental studies

13.7 Numerical studies

13.8 Conclusions

Part Three: Sorption and thermochemical heat storage systems

New chapter: Sorption systems for thermal energy storage – Authors already identified

Abstract

xx.1 Introduction

xx.2 Description of sorption systems

xx. 3 Characterization of sorption systems

xx.4 Applications of sorption TES

xx.5 Conclusions and future trends

New chapter: Thermodynamic and dynamic models for thermal energy storage systems – Authors already identified

Abstract

xx.1 Introduction

xx.2 Thermodynamic models

xx.3 Dynamic models

ss.4 Conclusions

14: Using thermochemical reactions in thermal energy storage systems – Minor revision

Abstract

14.1 Introduction

14.2 Applications of reversible gas–gas reactions

14.3 Applications of reversible gas–solid reactions

14.4 Conclusion

15: Modeling thermochemical reactions in thermal energy storage systems – Minor revision

Abstract

15.1 Introduction

15.2 Grain model technique (Mampel’s approach)

15.3 Reactor model technique (continuum approach)

15.4 Molecular simulation methods: quantum chemical simulations (DFT)

15.5 Molecular simulation methods: statistical mechanics

15.6 Molecular simulation methods: molecular dynamics (MD)

15.7 Properties estimation from molecular dynamics simulation

15.8 Examples

15.9 Conclusion and future trends

Acknowledgements

Part Four: Systems operation and applications

16: Monitoring and control of thermal energy storage systems - Minor or no revision (authors did not answer to query, might need to be changed)

Abstract

16.1 Introduction

16.2 Overview of state-of-the-art monitoring and control of thermal energy storage systems

16.3 Stand-alone control and monitoring of heating devices

16.4 Data logging and heat metering of heating devices

16.5 Future trends in the monitoring and control of thermal storage systems

17: Thermal energy storage systems for heating and hot water in residential buildings – Minor revision

Abstract

17.1 Introduction

17.2 Requirements for thermal energy storage in individual residential buildings

17.3 Sensible heat storage for space heating in individual residential buildings

17.4 Latent and sorption heat storage for space heating in individual residential buildings

17.5 Thermal energy storage for domestic hot water and combined systems in individual residential buildings

17.6 Conclusions and future trends

18: Thermal energy storage systems for district heating and cooling – Minor revision

Abstract

18.1 Introduction

18.2 District heating and cooling overview

18.3 Advances in applications of thermal energy storage systems

18.4 Future trends

19: Thermal energy storage (TES) systems using heat from waste – Minor revision

Abstract

19.1 Introduction

19.2 Generation of waste process heat in different industries

19.3 Application of thermal energy storage (TES) for valorization of waste process heat

19.4 Conclusions

20: Thermal energy storage (TES) systems for cogeneration and trigeneration systems - Minor or no revision (author did not answer to query, might need to be changed)

Abstract

20.1 Introduction

20.2 Overview of cogeneration and trigeneration systems

20.3 Design of thermal energy storage for cogeneration and trigeneration systems

20.4 Implementation of thermal energy storage in cogeneration and trigeneration systems

20.5 Future trends

20.6 Conclusion

21: Thermal energy storage systems for concentrating solar power (CSP) technology – Major revision

Abstract

21.1 Introduction

21.2 Commercial concentrating solar power (CSP) plants with integrated storage capacity

21.3 Research and development in CSP storage systems

21.4 Conclusion

22: Thermal energy storage (TES) systems for greenhouse technology - Minor or no revision (authors did not answer to query, might need to be changed)

Abstract

22.1 Introduction

22.2 Greenhouse heating and cooling

22.3 Thermal energy storage (TES) technologies for greenhouse systems

22.4 Case studies for TES in greenhouses

22.5 Conclusions and future trends

23: Thermal energy storage (TES) systems for cooling in residential buildings – Minor revision

Abstract

23.1 Introduction

23.2 Sustainable cooling through passive systems in building envelopes

23.3 Sustainable cooling through phase change material (PCM) in active systems

23.4 Sustainable cooling through sorption systems

23.5 Sustainable cooling through seasonal storage

23.6 Conclusions

Acknowledgements

Index

New chapter: Thermal energy storage in the transport sector – Authors to be identified

xx.1 Introduction

xx.2 Thermal energy storage (TES) technologies for the transport sector

xx.3 Case studies

xx.4 Conclusions and future trends

New chapter: Environmental aspects of thermal energy storage – Authors to be identified

xx.1 Introduction

xx.2 Evaluation of the environmental aspects of thermal energy storage (TES)

xx.3 Life cycle assessment (LCA) in TES

xx.4 Case studies

xx.5 Conclusions and future trends

New chapter: Economic aspects of thermal energy storage – Authors to be identified

xx.1 Introduction

xx.2 Evaluation of the economic aspects of thermal energy storage (TES)

xx.3 Life cycle cost (LCC) in TES

xx.4 Levelized cost of electricity (LCoE) in TES applications

xx.5 Conclusions and future trends


Description

Advances in Thermal Energy Storage Systems, 2nd edition, presents a fully updated comprehensive analysis of thermal energy storage systems (TES) including all major advances and developments since the first edition published. This very successful publication provides readers with all the information related to TES in one resource, along with a variety of applications across the energy/power and construction sectors, as well as, new to this edition, the transport industry. After an introduction to TES systems, editor Dr. Prof. Luisa Cabeza and her team of expert authors consider the source, design and operation of the use of water, molten salts, concrete, aquifers, boreholes and a variety of phase-change materials for TES systems, before analyzing and simulating underground TES systems.

This edition benefits from 5 new chapters covering the most advanced technologies including sorption systems, thermodynamic and dynamic modelling as well as applications to the transport industry and the environmental and economic aspects of TES. It will benefit researchers and academics of energy systems and thermal energy storage, construction engineering academics, engineers and practitioners in the energy and power industry, as well as architects of plants and storage systems and R&D managers.

Key Features

  • Includes 5 brand new chapters covering Sorption systems, Thermodynamic and dynamic models, applications to the transport sector, environmental aspects of TES and economic aspects of TES
  • All existing chapters are updated and revised to reflect the most recent advances in the research and technologies of the field
  • Reviews heat storage technologies, including the use of water, molten salts, concrete and boreholes in one comprehensive resource
  • Describes latent heat storage systems and thermochemical heat storage
  • Includes information on the monitoring and control of thermal energy storage systems, and considers their applications in residential buildings, power plants and industry

Readership

Academia: Researchers and academics of energy systems and thermal energy storage, as well as construction engineering.
Industry: Engineers and practitioners in energy, power and construction, as well as architects of plants and storage facilities.
R&D managers with an interest in thermal energy storage solutions, civil engineers with an interest in passive houses.


Details

No. of pages:
796
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Woodhead Publishing 2021
Published:
30th October 2020
Imprint:
Woodhead Publishing
Hardcover ISBN:
9780128198858

Ratings and Reviews


About the Editor

Luisa F. Cabeza

Luisa F. Cabeza is Professor at the University of Lleida (Spain) where she leads the GREA research group. She has co-authored over 100 journal papers and several book chapters. Luisa F. Cabeza received her PhD in Industrial Engineering in 1996 from the University Ramon Llull, Barcelona, Spain. She also holds degrees in Chemical Engineering (1992) and in Industrial Engineering (1993), as well as an MBA (1995) from the same University. Her interests include the different TES technologies (sensible, latent and thermochemical), applications (buildings, industry, refrigeration, CSP, etc.), and social aspects. She also acts as subject editor of the journals Renewable Energy, and Solar Energy.

Affiliations and Expertise

Professor, University of Lleida, Spain