Advances in Legumes for Sustainable Intensification

Advances in Legumes for Sustainable Intensification

1st Edition - June 29, 2022

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  • Editors: Ram Meena, Sandeep Kumar
  • eBook ISBN: 9780323886000
  • Paperback ISBN: 9780323857970

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Description

Advances in Legume-based Agroecoystem for Sustainable Intensification explores current research and future strategies for ensuring capacity growth and socioeconomic improvement through the utilization of legume crop cultivation and production in the achievement of sustainability development goals (SDGs). Sections cover the role of legumes in addressing issues of food security, improving nitrogen in the environment, environmental sustainability, economic-environmentally optimized systems, the importance and impact of nitrogen, organic production, and biomass potential, legume production, biology, breeding improvement, cropping systems, and the use of legumes for eco-friendly weed management. This book is an important resource for scientists, researchers and advanced students interested in championing the effective utilization of legumes for agronomic and ecological benefit.

Key Features

  • Focuses on opportunities for agricultural impact and sustainability
  • Presents insights into both agricultural sustainability and eco-intensification
  • Includes the impact of legume production on societal impacts such as health and wealth management

Readership

Researchers, scientists, and academics seeking to utilize new methods for reaching SDGs. Policy makers and environmental scientists

Table of Contents

  • Cover Image
  • Title Page
  • Copyright
  • Table of Contents
  • Contributors
  • Acknowledgments
  • Section I Legumes for sustainable crop intensification
  • Chapter 1 Legume-based agroecosystem for sustainable intensification: An overview
  • 1.1 Introduction
  • 1.2 Vertical intensification of legumes
  • 1.3 Horizontal intensification of legumes
  • 1.4 Improved human nutrition, health, and livelihood
  • 1.5 Improved animal health
  • 1.6 Improved human and animal’s dietary energy
  • 1.7 Legumes for nitrogen and weed manager in cropping system
  • 1.8 Breeding for enhancing yield potential of grain legumes
  • 1.9 Protection of soil from erosion and degradation
  • 1.10 Promoting soil properties and associated processes
  • 1.11 Reduce ecological footprint and ensures climate-resilient agriculture
  • 1.12 Improved ecosystem services sustainably
  • 1.13 Conclusions
  • Acknowledgment
  • References
  • Chapter 2 Scope for production of pulses in rice fallow lands in South Asia
  • 2.1 Introduction
  • 2.2 Global scenario and constraints of rice fallow management
  • 2.3 Strategies and innovative pathway for targeting rice fallow
  • 2.4 Geospatial technology targeting the rice fallow lands: A case study of Odisha
  • 2.5 Intensification and crop diversification of rice fallows through suitable site-specific varieties of pulse crops
  • 2.6 Road map for scaling adoption and empowering farmers through value chain and addition
  • 2.7 Incentive and policy framework development for managing rice fallow
  • 2.8 Future perspectives
  • 2.9 Conclusions
  • Acknowledgments
  • Abbreviations
  • References
  • Chapter 3 Sustainable intensification in cropping systems through inclusion of legumes
  • 3.1 Introduction
  • 3.2 Prospectus of legumes in world and India
  • 3.3 Importance of legumes in agricultural intensification
  • 3.4 Biophysical resource constraints and environmental degradation in existing cropping system
  • 3.5 Sustainable intensification: An overview
  • 3.6 Sustainable intensification indicators/indices/indexes
  • 3.7 Need and opportunities for sustainable intensification in different agroecosystem
  • 3.8 Legume-based sustainable intensification
  • 3.9 Policies and incentives for supporting legume-based sustainable intensification
  • 3.10 Research gap and ways to overcome
  • 3.11 Future perspectives
  • 3.12 Conclusions
  • Abbreviations
  • References
  • Chapter 4 Legumes for efficient utilization of summer fallow
  • 4.1 Introduction
  • 4.2 Global fallow period—an overview
  • 4.3 Benefits of legumes as summer fallow crop
  • 4.4 Limitations of legume fallow
  • 4.5 Future research needs in legumes for summer fallow
  • 4.6 Conclusions
  • Abbreviations
  • References
  • Chapter 5 Efficient utilization of rice fallow through pulse cultivation
  • 5.1 Introduction
  • 5.2 Overview of rice-based cropping systems
  • 5.3 Rice-fallow agroecosystem
  • 5.4 Scope for pulses production in rice-fallow areas
  • 5.5 Pulse cultivation in rice-fallow
  • 5.6 Pulses for sustainability of farms and economic benefits of farming communities in rice-fallow
  • 5.7 Case studies
  • 5.8 Possible future policy and action plan for promoting pulses in rice-fallow
  • 5.9 Conclusions
  • Abbreviations
  • References
  • Chapter 6 Legumes for nutrient management in the cropping system
  • 6.1 Introduction
  • 6.2 Ways to loss of excessive use of nitrogen in agricultural soils
  • 6.3 Multiple benefits of legumes for agricultural sustainability
  • 6.4 Breeding, biotechnology, and genetic engineering for improving legumes-based nitrogen
  • 6.5 Physiological mechanism of biological nitrogen fixation
  • 6.6 Integrated management for enhancing nitrogen in soils
  • 6.7 Conclusions
  • Abbreviations
  • References
  • Chapter 7 Residual nitrogen for succeeding crops in legume-based cropping system
  • 7.1 Introduction
  • 7.2 Nitrogen dynamics in legume-based cropping systems
  • 7.3 Atmospheric nitrogen fixation in legume-rhizobium system
  • 7.4 Uptake of fixed atmospheric nitrogen by legume crops
  • 7.5 Residual nitrogen from legume crops
  • 7.6 Release kinetics of residual nitrogen
  • 7.7 Fate of residual nitrogen in soil
  • 7.8 Effect of legumes on residual nitrogen
  • 7.9 Forms of residual nitrogen affecting uptake by succeeding crops in legumes-based cropping systems
  • 7.10 Succeeding crops in the legume-based cropping system
  • 7.11 Legume-based cropping system for reducing environmental footprint
  • 7.12 Residual form of fixed atmospheric nitrogen in soil
  • 7.13 Legumes-based cropping systems for sustainability of agroecosystems
  • 7.14 Residual nitrogen balance, economic efficiency, and system productivity analysis in legume-based cropping systems
  • 7.15 Nutrient recovery, availability, and use efficiency of residual nitrogen by succeeding crops
  • 7.16 Effect of residual nitrogen on water availability, weed suspension, and soil health in succeeding crops
  • 7.17 Effect of legumes-based cropping system on soil carbon stabilization in succeeding crops
  • 7.18 Evaluation of the benefit of legume residual nitrogen to succeeding crops
  • 7.19 Future perspectives
  • 7.20 Conclusions
  • Abbreviation
  • References
  • Chapter 8 Legumes for eco-friendly weed management in agroecosystem
  • 8.1 Introduction
  • 8.2 Consequences of weeds in crop production system
  • 8.3 Adverse effect of excessive use of herbicides on food and environmental security
  • 8.4 Potential legume species for weed control in cropping systems
  • 8.5 Role of legume as a mean of weed suppression in cropping systems
  • 8.6 Allelopathic potential of legumes for weed control in cropping systems
  • 8.7 Assessment of the competitive ability of legumes to weeds in intercropping and sequential cropping
  • 8.8 Economic analysis of legumes effect on weeds
  • 8.9 Challenges for using legume as weed suppression
  • 8.10 Possible future policy and action plan
  • 8.11 Conclusions
  • Acknowledgment
  • Abbreviations
  • References
  • Section II Human and animal Health
  • Chapter 9 Grain legumes: A diversified diet for sustainable livelihood, food, and nutritional security
  • 9.1 Introduction
  • 9.2 Malnutrition: an overview
  • 9.3 Remedies for elevating malnutrition through grain legumes
  • 9.4 Conclusions
  • Abbreviations
  • References
  • Chapter 10 Recent strategies for pulse biofortification to combat malnutrition
  • 10.1 Introduction
  • 10.2 Pulses biofortification and current need to replace the malnutrition
  • 10.3 Nutrient value of different pulses
  • 10.4 Bioavailability of nutrients in pulses
  • 10.5 Need of pulses biofortification
  • 10.6 Current status and achievements in pulses biofortification
  • 10.7 Methodologies of biofortification
  • 10.8 Challenges in pulses biofortification
  • 10.9 Future perspectives
  • 10.10 Conclusions
  • Abbreviations
  • References
  • Chapter 11 Forage legumes for human, animals, and environment
  • 11.1 Introduction
  • 11.2 Characteristic of forage legumes
  • 11.3 Main forage legumes species and worldwide distribution
  • 11.4 Methods of cultivation (sole or mixture cropping)
  • 11.5 Methods of biomass utilization and conservation
  • 11.6 Quality of forage for animals feeding
  • 11.7 Forage legumes for horticulture production
  • 11.8 Forage legumes for marginal land and soil protection
  • 11.9 Forage legumes for human
  • 11.10 Forage legumes for environmental protection
  • 11.11 Future perspectives and research issues of forage legumes
  • 11.12 Case study
  • 11.13 Conclusions
  • Abbreviation
  • References
  • Chapter 12 Legumes for animal nutrition and dietary energy
  • 12.1 Introduction
  • 12.2 Forage legumes hay and silage preservation
  • 12.3 Nutritional value of forage legumes and implications for animal production
  • 12.4 Forage legumes nutrient digestibility and partitioning in ruminants
  • 12.5 Secondary compounds in forage legumes: taking advantage
  • 12.6 Animal production
  • 12.7 Novel grazing system of forage legume utilization
  • 12.8 Future perspectives
  • 12.9 Conclusions
  • Abbreviations
  • References
  • Section III Soil health management
  • Chapter 13 Legumes protect the soil erosion and ecosystem services
  • 13.1 Introduction
  • 13.2 Soil processes, erosion, and conservation
  • 13.3 Legumes to control soil erosion in systems
  • 13.4 Perennial legume shrubs, bushes, and hedgerows for soil and water conservation
  • 13.5 Potential of legumes in bench terracing in hilly region to control erosion
  • 13.6 Conclusions and future perspectives
  • Acknowledgments
  • Abbreviations
  • References
  • Chapter 14 Sustainable management of land degradation through legume-based cropping system
  • 14.1 Introduction
  • 14.2 Global issues affecting food security: threats to soil, water, and biodiversity
  • 14.3 Extent and distribution of degraded soils globally
  • 14.4 Land degradation’s current and expected effects on food security
  • 14.5 Opportunities for ensuring global food security through management of degraded land
  • 14.6 Problem, severity, and future possibilities of land degradation in existing cropping systems without inclusion of legumes
  • 14.7 How legumes could pay for sustainable management of unutilized degraded lands
  • 14.8 Economic analyses of land improvement through legumes in cropping system
  • 14.9 Possibilities and barriers of improvement of degraded lands through legumes
  • 14.10 Possible future policy and action plan
  • 14.11 Conclusions
  • Abbreviations
  • References
  • Chapter 15 Legumes effect on nitrogen mineralization and microbial biomass potential in organic farming
  • 15.1 Introduction
  • 15.2 Legumes in organic farming: Theory and practices
  • 15.3 Principles of organic farming and role of legumes in fulfilling them
  • 15.4 Legumes effects on nitrogen pool
  • 15.5 Nitrogen mineralization and its significance in crop production
  • 15.6 Chemistry of nitrogen mineralization
  • 15.7 Linkage among legumes, nitrogen mineralization, and soil microbial biomass
  • 15.8 Legume’s effect on nitrogen mineralization
  • 15.9 Effect of legumes on soil microbial diversity
  • 15.10 Effect of legumes on soil biochemical reactions
  • 15.11 Effect of legumes on soil enzymes
  • 15.12 Possible future policy and action plan
  • 15.13 Conclusions
  • Abbreviations
  • References
  • Chapter 16 Legume-based inter-cropping to achieve the crop, soil, and environmental health security
  • 16.1 Introduction
  • 16.2 Legume based inter-cropping and ecosystem services
  • 16.3 Legumes as inter-crops
  • 16.4 Legumes inter-cropping and soil health
  • 16.5 Legumes inter-cropping and plant health
  • 16.6 Legume inter-cropping for insect-disease and pest management of component crops
  • 16.7 Constraints and challenges for legumes in inter-cropping system
  • 16.8 Promotional opportunities for legumes in inter-cropping system
  • 16.9 Possible future policy and action plan
  • 16.10 Conclusions
  • Abbreviations
  • References
  • Chapter 17 Soil carbon and legumes
  • 17.1 Introduction
  • 17.2 Soil carbon pools and carbon mineralization
  • 17.3 Issues of declining soil carbon under intensive cropping system
  • 17.4 Role of legumes in nutrient stoichiometry
  • 17.5 Role of legumes in carbon stoichiometry
  • 17.6 Potential of legumes for soil carbon sequestration
  • 17.7 Screening of legumes species for increased carbon sequestration
  • 17.8 Role of leguminous root biomass in sequestering carbon
  • 17.9 Legumes for soil carbon sequestration
  • 17.10 Legumes in cropping systems
  • 17.11 Limitations, advantages and opportunities in soil carbon sequestration through legumes
  • 17.12 Future perspectives
  • 17.13 Conclusions
  • Abbreviations
  • References
  • Chapter 18 Role of legumes in phytoremediation of heavy metals
  • 18.1 Introduction
  • 18.2 Heavy metal pollutants: Soil contamination and human health
  • 18.3 Heavy metal stress for legumes and associated biological processes
  • 18.4 Physiological aspects of legumes under heavy metal stress
  • 18.5 Microbially mediated heavy metal transformations in the rhizosphere
  • 18.6 Role of legumes in phytoremediation of heavy metal polluted soils
  • 18.7 Heavy metal, soil, and plant interaction
  • 18.8 Strengthening legume associated-rhizobia to improve heavy-metal phytoremediation
  • 18.9 Genomic manipulation for improving legume phytoremediation
  • 18.10 Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi – legume association in managing heavy metals contaminated soils
  • 18.11 Role of plant growth promoting rhizobia in managing heavy metals contaminated soils
  • 18.12 Legume-rhizobium association to manage heavy metals contaminated soils
  • 18.13 Conclusion and future perspectives
  • Abbreviations
  • References
  • Section IV Agroecosystems Management
  • Chapter 19 Legumes for agroecosystem services and sustainability
  • 19.1 Introduction
  • 19.2 Agroecosystem services
  • 19.3 Diversification of production system to maximize agroecosystem services
  • 19.4 Ecosystem services provided by legumes
  • 19.5 Legume contribution to sustainable agriculture
  • 19.6 Challenges in maximizing benefits from agroecosystem services
  • 19.7 Conclusions
  • Abbreviations
  • References
  • Chapter 20 Potential of legume-based cropping systems for climate change adaptation and mitigation
  • 20.1 Introduction
  • 20.2 Climate change and its impacts: present status and future projection
  • 20.3 Climate change adaptation and mitigation
  • 20.4 Legumes: a vital component of climate-smart cropping system
  • 20.5 Role of legume crops in climate change adaptation in system-based approach
  • 20.6 Role of legumes in climate change mitigation in system-based approach
  • 20.7 Ways to remove barriers in the way of inclusion of legumes in cropping system
  • 20.8 Research priorities and resource development of climate-smart legume-based system
  • 20.9 Possible future policy and action plan
  • 20.10 Conclusions
  • Acknowledgments
  • Abbreviations
  • References
  • Chapter 21 Legumes to reduce ecological footprints for climate-smart cropping systems
  • 21.1 Introduction
  • 21.2 Ecological footprint
  • 21.3 Legumes as climate-smart crop
  • 21.4 Greenhouse gases emission reduction potential of legumes in cropping system
  • 21.5 Role of legumes in ecological footprint reduction in cropping system
  • 21.6 Best crop management practices and their footprint reduction potential in legume-based cropping system
  • 21.7 Future policy and action Plan
  • 21.8 Conclusions
  • Abbreviations
  • References
  • Chapter 22 Environmental footprints of legumes-based agroecosystems for sustainable development
  • 22.1 Introduction
  • 22.2 Trends and current scenario of global greenhouse gases emission in agroecosystems
  • 22.3 Environmental footprint and its assessment
  • 22.4 Environmental footprint in legume-based agroecosystem
  • 22.5 Best crop management practices and their environmental footprint reduction in legume-based agroecosystem
  • 22.6 Possible future policy and action plan
  • 22.7 Conclusions
  • Abbreviations
  • References
  • Chapter 23 Legumes for energy efficiency in agricultural systems
  • 23.1 Introduction
  • 23.2 Energy consumption and its consequences in agricultural systems: An overview
  • 23.3 Leguminous and nonleguminous energy crops
  • 23.4 Energy consumption patterns in legume-based agricultural systems
  • 23.5 Energy saving potentials of legumes
  • 23.6 Ways to further improve the energy consumption efficiency in legumes
  • 23.7 Possible future policy and action plan
  • 23.8 Conclusions
  • Abbreviations
  • References
  • Chapter 24 Potential of tree legumes in agroforestry systems and soil conservation
  • 24.1 Introduction
  • 24.2 Legume’s description
  • 24.3 Soil degradation and soil productivity
  • 24.4 Agroforestry as an exploitation practical option
  • 24.5 Tree legumes for sustainable intensification of agricultural production
  • 24.6 Potential of tree legumes in agroforestry systems
  • 24.7 Efficient use of degraded lands through legume trees in agroforestry system and nitrogen fixation measurement techniques
  • 24.8 Improving the symbiotic properties of the nitrogen-fixing trees
  • 24.9 Possible future policy and action plan
  • 24.10 Conclusions
  • Abbreviations
  • References
  • Chapter 25 Leguminous trees for sustainable tropical agroforestry
  • 25.1 Introduction
  • 25.2 Tropical agroforestry for clean environment
  • 25.3 Legume trees for carbon sequestration for a long time
  • 25.4 Legume trees for nitrogen sequestration for a long time
  • 25.5 Leguminous trees and the soil sustainability
  • 25.6 Leguminous trees and drought tolerance
  • 25.7 Leguminous trees for ecosystem services
  • 25.8 Multipurpose legume trees and integration in tropical and subtropical agroforestry systems
  • 25.9 Conclusions and future perspectives
  • Abbreviations
  • References
  • Section V Crop Improvement
  • Chapter 26 Grain legumes: Recent advances and technological interventions
  • 26.1 Introduction
  • 26.2 Legume’s genetic architecture modification techniques
  • 26.3 Precision phenotyping tools in legumes
  • 26.4 Legume biofortification
  • 26.5 Nanotechnology in legume
  • 26.6 Speed breeding in legumes
  • 26.7 Digitalization of breeding records in legumes
  • 26.8 Recently developed agro-technologies
  • 26.9 Possibly future interventions and action plans
  • 26.10 Conclusions
  • Abbreviations
  • Reference
  • Chapter 27 Current trends in genetic enhancement of legumes in the genomics era for a sustainable future
  • 27.1 Introduction
  • 27.2 Genetic enhancement of legume crops
  • 27.3 Neglected and underutilized legume crops
  • 27.4 Genetic improvement of neglected and underutilized legumes
  • 27.5 Legume trait mapping for genetic enhancements
  • 27.6 Different tools/methodologies for genetic enhancements
  • 27.7 Resequencing efforts for genetic information gain
  • 27.8 Accelerated legumes domestication
  • 27.9 Legume germplasm stocks as genetic sources of stress tolerance traits
  • 27.10 Role of prebreeding and fast-breeding in genetic enhancement
  • 27.11 Future perspectives and conclusions
  • Abbreviations
  • References
  • Chapter 28 Conventional, genomics, and post-genomics era of pulses breeding: Current status and future prospects
  • 28.1 Introduction
  • 28.2 Major constraints in pulses production and productivity
  • 28.3 Genetic resources for pulses improvement
  • 28.4 Conventional breeding for pulses improvement
  • 28.5 Shortfalls of conventional breeding in pulses
  • 28.6 Genomics era in pulses
  • 28.7 Phenomics- high-throughput phenotyping
  • 28.8 Paradigm shift to post gnomic tools in pulses breeding
  • 28.9 Beyond genomics: Employment of post-genomic approaches in pulses breeding
  • 28.10 Future perspectives
  • 28.11 Conclusions
  • Abbreviations
  • References
  • Chapter 29 Participatory breeding for improving legume landraces in small-scale farming
  • 29.1 Introduction
  • 29.2 Principles and concepts of participatory breeding in legume crops
  • 29.3 Importance of participatory breeding under current global context
  • 29.4 Methods of participatory breeding and participatory variety selection in legume crops
  • 29.5 Variety release and maintenance
  • 29.6 Seed production under community seed banks scheme
  • 29.7 Successful participatory breeding experiences on legume crops
  • 29.8 Future perspectives
  • 29.9 Conclusions
  • Acknowledgments
  • Competing interests
  • Abbreviations
  • References
  • Chapter 30 Prospects for genome-wide selection for quantitative traits in legumes
  • 30.1 Introduction
  • 30.2 Genomic selection and breeding programs
  • 30.3 Population design for genomic selection
  • 30.4 Genomic selection and prediction models
  • 30.5 Genomic selection and quantitative traits
  • 30.6 Efforts and effectiveness of genomic selection in legumes
  • 30.7 Genomic selection and speed breeding—speed genomic selection
  • 30.8 Future directions of genomic selection in legume
  • 30.9 Conclusion
  • Acknowledgments
  • Abbreviations
  • References
  • Section VI Economic importance
  • Chapter 31 Effect of legumes on nitrogen economy and budgeting in South Asia
  • 31.1 Introduction
  • 31.2 Nitrogen budgeting of South Asia
  • 31.3 Legume’s nitrogen fixation in South Asia
  • 31.4 Legumes for reducing nitrogen budget
  • 31.5 Nitrogen fixation and calculation in South Asia
  • 31.6 Nitrogen effects on soil, water, and environment
  • 31.7 Legume’s role to manage soil and environmental quality
  • 31.8 Increase nitrogen use efficiency to manage the soil, water, and environment
  • 31.9 Policies for nitrogen management in South Asia
  • 31.10 Legume-based policies for soil and environmental protection
  • 31.11 Needful advance plans for organizations to reduce nitrogen consumption with legume accommodation
  • 31.12 Conclusions
  • Abbreviations
  • Acknowledgment
  • References
  • Chapter 32 Pulses production, trade and policy imperatives: A global perspective
  • 32.1 Introduction
  • 32.2 Trends in area, production, and productivity of pulses
  • 32.3 Trends in pulses trade
  • 32.4 Research trends in pulses
  • 32.5 Pulses sector: A case of India
  • 32.6 Research themes and priority areas
  • 32.7 Future perspectives
  • 32.8 Conclusions
  • Abbreviations
  • References
  • Chapter 33 Multiple pathways of legume-based systems towards environmental, social, and economic sustainability in smallholder systems
  • 33.1 Introduction
  • 33.2 Pathway consideration for legume-based cropping systems
  • 33.3 Legume-based cropping systems
  • 33.4 Legume-based cropping systems and soil fertility
  • 33.5 Legume-based cropping systems and their linkages with livestock systems
  • 33.6 Legume-based cropping systems: Emission and energetics
  • 33.7 The economics and market opportunities of legumes
  • 33.8 Legume-based cropping systems and food, nutrition, and health outcomes
  • 33.9 Future perspectives
  • 33.10 Conclusions
  • Abbreviations
  • References
  • Chapter 34 Legumes for improving socio-economic conditions of farmers in rainfed agroecosystem
  • 34.1 Introduction
  • 34.2 Rainfed agro-ecosystems - An overview
  • 34.3 Constraints and challenges of rainfed farming
  • 34.4 Legumes in rainfed farming
  • 34.5 Potential of legumes and their socio-economic benefits in sustainable and productive rainfed farming
  • 34.6 Socio-economic benefits of legumes
  • 34.7 Challenges and opportunities for legumes cultivation by smallholders in rainfed agroecosystem
  • 34.8 Possible future policy and action plan
  • 34.9 Major/broad areas for yield improvement in rainfed crops in the future
  • 34.10 Future perspectives
  • 34.11 Conclusions
  • Abbreviations
  • References
  • Index

Product details

  • No. of pages: 728
  • Language: English
  • Copyright: © Academic Press 2022
  • Published: June 29, 2022
  • Imprint: Academic Press
  • eBook ISBN: 9780323886000
  • Paperback ISBN: 9780323857970

About the Editors

Ram Meena

Dr. Ram Swaroop Meena is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Agronomy, Institute of Agricultural Sciences, BHU, Varanasi (UP). He completed his postdoctoral research on soil carbon sequestration under Prof. Rattan Lal, distinguished scientist, and Director, Carbon Management and Sequestration Centre (CMASC), The Ohio State University, USA. He is working on soil sustainability, crop productivity, and resource use efficiency. He has the right to one patent on low-cost biochar preparation. He has published extensively in scientific journals and books and has worked as an expert in the National Council of Educational Research and Training (NCERT), MHRD, GOI, to develop the two books for school education. Dr. Meena has been awarded several awards, including Best Article, Young Faculty, Global Research, Excellence in Research, andHonourable Faculty.

Affiliations and Expertise

Assistant Professor, Department of Agronomy, Institute of Agricultural Sciences, India.

Sandeep Kumar

Dr. Sandeep Kumar is currently working as a scientist (Agronomy) at the ICAR-Indian Agricultural Research Institute, Regional Station, Karnal, India. His research interests have focused on enhancing resource use efficiencies for sustainable crop production. He has published 6 books and over 35 papers in leading national and international peer-reviewed journals and has also contributed to more than 25 book chapters. He has received numerous national awards, including Young Scientist, Best Paper Awards, Best Research Scholar, and Best Master’s Thesis awards.

Affiliations and Expertise

Scientist, Division of Crop Production, ICAR-Institute of Pulse Research, Kanpur, Uttar Pradseh, India

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