Advances in Hydrogen Production, Storage and Distribution - 1st Edition - ISBN: 9780857097682, 9780857097736

Advances in Hydrogen Production, Storage and Distribution

1st Edition

Editors: Angelo Basile Adolfo Iulianelli
eBook ISBN: 9780857097736
Hardcover ISBN: 9780857097682
Imprint: Woodhead Publishing
Published Date: 3rd July 2014
Page Count: 574
Tax/VAT will be calculated at check-out Price includes VAT (GST)
30% off
30% off
30% off
30% off
30% off
20% off
20% off
25% off
25% off
25% off
25% off
25% off
20% off
20% off
30% off
30% off
30% off
30% off
30% off
20% off
20% off
160.00
112.00
112.00
112.00
112.00
112.00
128.00
128.00
265.00
198.75
198.75
198.75
198.75
198.75
212.00
212.00
200.00
140.00
140.00
140.00
140.00
140.00
160.00
160.00
Unavailable
Price includes VAT (GST)
× DRM-Free

Easy - Download and start reading immediately. There’s no activation process to access eBooks; all eBooks are fully searchable, and enabled for copying, pasting, and printing.

Flexible - Read on multiple operating systems and devices. Easily read eBooks on smart phones, computers, or any eBook readers, including Kindle.

Open - Buy once, receive and download all available eBook formats, including PDF, EPUB, and Mobi (for Kindle).

Institutional Access

Secure Checkout

Personal information is secured with SSL technology.

Free Shipping

Free global shipping
No minimum order.

Table of Contents

  • Contributor contact details
  • Woodhead Publishing Series in Energy
  • Dedication
  • Preface
  • Part I: Fundamentals of hydrogen production
    • 1. Key challenges in the development of an infrastructure for hydrogen production, delivery, storage and use
      • Abstract:
      • 1.1 Introduction
      • 1.2 The hydrogen infrastructure
      • 1.3 Building an infrastructure for the hydrogen economy
      • 1.4 National planning for hydrogen infrastructure building
      • 1.5 Conclusion: outlook for the hydrogen economy
      • 1.6 Summary
      • 1.7 Sources of further information and advice
      • 1.8 References
      • 1.9 Appendix: acronyms
    • 2. Assessing the environmental impact of hydrogen energy production
      • Abstract:
      • 2.1 Introduction
      • 2.2 Self-regulating energy systems and materials circulation
      • 2.3 An ideal energy system based on materials circulation
      • 2.4 The environmental impact factor (EIF) of carbon and hydrogen
      • 2.5 Local environmental impact factors for hydrogen and carbon in Japan
      • 2.6 A green hydrogen energy system
      • 2.7 Conclusions
      • 2.8 References
      • 2.9 Appendix: list of symbols and acronyms
    • 3. Hydrogen production from fossil fuel and biomass feedstocks
      • Abstract:
      • 3.1 Introduction: hydrogen from coal and natural gas
      • 3.2 Partial oxidation (POX) technology
      • 3.3 Steam reforming of natural gas and naphtha
      • 3.4 Steam reforming and steam gasification of bio-feedstock
      • 3.5 Economics and CO2 emissions of biomass gasification
      • 3.6 Traditional feedstock purification: catalyst poison removal
      • 3.7 Synthesis gas processing
      • 3.8 Future trends and conclusions
      • 3.9 References
      • 3.10 Appendix: nomenclature
    • 4. Hydrogen production in conventional, bio-based and nuclear power plants
      • Abstract:
      • 4.1 Introduction
      • 4.2 Hydrogen production in conventional and bio-based power plants
      • 4.3 Combined carbon capture and storage (CCS)
      • 4.4 Hydrogen production in nuclear power plants
      • 4.5 Conclusions
      • 4.6 References
      • 4.7 Appendix: list of symbols and acronyms
    • 5. Portable and small-scale stationary hydrogen production from micro-reactor systems
      • Abstract:
      • 5.1 Introduction
      • 5.2 Portable and small-scale hydrogen production
      • 5.3 Microfluidic devices for process intensification
      • 5.4 Feedstocks and technologies for hydrogen production in micro-reactors
      • 5.5 Micro-reactor design: key issues for hydrogen production
      • 5.6 Industrial scale-up and improvement of technology uptake
      • 5.7 Process analysis and the business case
      • 5.8 Future trends
      • 5.9 Conclusions
      • 5.11 Acknowledgments
      • 5.10 Sources of further information and advice
      • 5.12 References
      • 5.13 Appendix: abbreviations
  • Part II: Hydrogen production from renewable sources
    • 6. Hydrogen production by water electrolysis
      • Abstract:
      • 6.1 Introduction
      • 6.2 Electrolytic hydrogen production
      • 6.3 Types of electrolyzers
      • 6.4 Water electrolysis thermodynamics
      • 6.5 Kinetics of water splitting
      • 6.6 Electrolyzer current-voltage (I–V) curves
      • 6.7 High-pressure water electrolysis
      • 6.8 Coupling electrolyzers with solar energy for vehicle hydrogen fueling
      • 6.9 Educational aspects of water electrolysis
      • 6.10 Major issues facing the use of water electrolysis for hydrogen production
      • 6.11 Future trends
      • 6.12 Conclusions
      • 6.13 Sources of further information and advice
      • 6.14 Acknowledgements
      • 6.15 References
      • 6.16 Appendix: nomenclature
    • 7. Development of a photo-electrochemical (PEC) reactor to convert carbon dioxide into methanol for biorefining
      • Abstract:
      • 7.1 Introduction
      • 7.2 Chemical reduction of CO2
      • 7.3 Mimicking natural enzymes for splitting water in photo-electrochemical (PEC) reactors
      • 7.4 Cathodic systems for CO2 reduction to methanol in PEC reactors
      • 7.5 Manufacturing an effective membrane electrode assembly
      • 7.6 Bio-based products from PEC CO2 reduction processes
      • 7.7 CO2 sources and purity issues
      • 7.8 Conversion of CO2 to methanol using solar energy
      • 7.9 Impacts on greenhouse gas reduction and life cycle assessment (LCA) analyses
      • 7.10 Conclusions
      • 7.11 References
    • 8. Photocatalytic production of hydrogen
      • Abstract:
      • 8.1 Introduction
      • 8.2 Hydrogen production through photocatalysis
      • 8.3 Engineering efficient photocatalysts for solar H2 production
      • 8.4 Photocatalytic water splitting
      • 8.5 Separate H2 and O2 evolution from photocatalytic water splitting
      • 8.6 Photocatalytic reforming of organics
      • 8.7 Future trends
      • 8.8 Conclusion
      • 8.9 References
      • 8.10 Appendix: list of symbols
    • 9. Bio-engineering algae as a source of hydrogen
      • Abstract:
      • 9.1 Introduction
      • 9.2 Principles of bio-engineering algae as a source of hydrogen
      • 9.3 Technologies for bio-engineering algae as a source of hydrogen
      • 9.4 Applications
      • 9.5 Future trends
      • 9.6 Conclusion
      • 9.7 References
      • 9.8 Appendix: the Calvin cycle
    • 10. Thermochemical production of hydrogen
      • Abstract:
      • 10.1 Introduction
      • 10.2 General aspects of hydrogen production
      • 10.3 Thermochemical hydrogen production from carbon-containing sources
      • 10.4 Thermochemical hydrogen production from carbon-free sources: water-splitting processes
      • 10.5 Conclusions
      • 10.6 References
      • 10.7 Appendix: list of acronyms and symbols
  • Part III: Hydrogen production using membrane reactors, storage and distribution
    • 11. Hydrogen production using inorganic membrane reactors
      • Abstract:
      • 11.1 Introduction
      • 11.2 Traditional reactors used for hydrogen production
      • 11.3 Catalysts for hydrogen production
      • 11.4 Membrane-integrated processes for hydrogen production
      • 11.5 Biohydrogen production processes
      • 11.6 Bioreactors for biohydrogen production
      • 11.7 Membrane reactors for biohydrogen production
      • 11.8 Conclusions and future trends
      • 11.9 References
      • 11.10 Appendix: list of acronyms and symbols
    • 12. In situ quantitative evaluation of hydrogen embrittlement in group 5 metals used for hydrogen separation and purification
      • Abstract:
      • 12.1 Introduction
      • 12.2 Principles of quantitative evaluation of hydrogen embrittlement
      • 12.3 Ductile-to-brittle transition hydrogen concentrations for group 5 metals
      • 12.4 Mechanical properties and fracture mode changes of Nb- or V-based alloys in hydrogen atmospheres
      • 12.5 Applications and future trends
      • 12.6 Summary
      • 12.7 Sources of further information and advice
      • 12.8 References
      • 12.9 Appendix: symbols and acronyms
    • 13. Design of group 5 metal-based alloy membranes with high hydrogen permeability and strong resistance to hydrogen embrittlement
      • Abstract:
      • 13.1 Introduction
      • 13.2 Hydrogen permeable metal membranes
      • 13.3 Alloy design for a group 5 metal-based hydrogen permeable membrane
      • 13.4 Design of Nb-based alloys
      • 13.5 V-based alloys
      • 13.6 Future trends
      • 13.7 Summary
      • 13.8 Sources of further information and advice
      • 13.9 References
      • 13.10 Appendix: symbols and acronyms
    • 14. Hydrogen storage in hydride-forming materials
      • Abstract:
      • 14.1 Introduction
      • 14.2 An overview of the main hydrogen storage technologies
      • 14.3 Hydrogen storage in hydride-forming metals and intermetallics
      • 14.4 Chemical hydrides
      • 14.5 Hydrogen storage specifications and developments in technology
      • 14.6 Conclusion
      • 14.7 References
      • 14.8 Appendix: nomenclature
    • 15. Hydrogen storage in nanoporous materials
      • Abstract:
      • 15.1 Introduction
      • 15.2 Hydrogen adsorption by porous solids
      • 15.3 Hydrogen adsorption measurements
      • 15.4 Hydrogen storage in porous carbons
      • 15.5 Hydrogen storage in zeolites
      • 15.6 Hydrogen storage in metal-organic frameworks
      • 15.7 Hydrogen storage in microporous organic polymers and other materials
      • 15.8 Use of nanoporous materials in practical storage units: material properties and thermal conductivity
      • 15.9 Storage unit modelling and design
      • 15.10 Future trends
      • 15.11 Conclusion
      • 15.12 References
      • 15.13 Appendix: symbols and abbreviations
    • 16. Hydrogen fuel cell technology
      • Abstract:
      • 16.1 Introduction
      • 16.2 Types of fuel cell (FC)
      • 16.3 The role of hydrogen and fuel cells in the energy supply chain
      • 16.4 Hydrogen fuel cells and renewable energy sources (RES) deployment
      • 16.5 Fuel cells in stationary applications
      • 16.6 Fuel cells in transportation applications
      • 16.7 Fuel cells in portable applications
      • 16.8 Research priorities in fuel cell technology
      • 16.9 Research priorities in polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs)
      • 16.10 Research priorities in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs)
      • 16.11 Conclusions
      • 16.12 Sources of further information and advice
      • 16.13 References
      • 16.14 Appendix: abbreviations
    • 17. Hydrogen as a fuel in transportation
      • Abstract:
      • 17.1 Introduction
      • 17.2 Hydrogen characteristics as an alternative fuel
      • 17.3 Advances in hydrogen vehicle technologies and fuel delivery
      • 17.4 History of hydrogen demonstrations
      • 17.5 Hydrogen fueling infrastructure for transportation
      • 17.6 Future trends
      • 17.7 Conclusions
      • 17.8 Sources of further information and advice
      • 17.9 References
      • 17.10 Appendix: list of acronyms
  • Index

Description

Advances in Hydrogen Production, Storage and Distribution reviews recent developments in this key component of the emerging "hydrogen economy," an energy infrastructure based on hydrogen. Since hydrogen can be produced without using fossil fuels, a move to such an economy has the potential to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and improve energy security. However, such a move also requires the advanced production, storage and usage techniques discussed in this book.

Part one introduces the fundamentals of hydrogen production, storage, and distribution, including an overview of the development of the necessary infrastructure, an analysis of the potential environmental benefits, and a review of some important hydrogen production technologies in conventional, bio-based, and nuclear power plants. Part two focuses on hydrogen production from renewable resources, and includes chapters outlining the production of hydrogen through water electrolysis, photocatalysis, and bioengineered algae. Finally, part three covers hydrogen production using inorganic membrane reactors, the storage of hydrogen, fuel cell technology, and the potential of hydrogen as a fuel for transportation.

Advances in Hydrogen Production, Storage and Distribution provides a detailed overview of the components and challenges of a hydrogen economy. This book is an invaluable resource for research and development professionals in the energy industry, as well as academics with an interest in this important subject.

Key Features

  • Reviews developments and research in this dynamic area
  • Discusses the challenges of creating an infrastructure to store and distribute hydrogen
  • Reviews the production of hydrogen using electrolysis and photo-catalytic methods

Readership

Advances in Hydrogen Production, Storage and Utilisation provides a detailed overview of the components and challenges of a hydrogen economy and is an invaluable resource for research and development professionals in the energy industry, as well as academics with an interest in this important subject.


Details

No. of pages:
574
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Woodhead Publishing 2014
Published:
Imprint:
Woodhead Publishing
eBook ISBN:
9780857097736
Hardcover ISBN:
9780857097682

About the Editors

Angelo Basile Editor

Basile, a Chemical Engineer, is a senior Researcher at the ITM-CNR where is responsible of the researches related to both the ultra-pure hydrogen production CO2 capture using Pd-based Membrane Reactors. Angelo Basile’s h-index is 36, with 187 document results (April 1st, 2016, www.scopus.com). He has 130 scientific papers in peer to peer journals and 230 papers in international congresses; editor/author of 27 scientific books and 80 chapters on international books on membrane science and technology; 6 Italian patents, 2 European patents and 5 worldwide patents. He is referee of 92 international scientific journals and Member of the Editorial Board of 18 of them. Basile is also Editor associate of the Int. J. Hydrogen Energy and Editor-in.-chief of the Int. J. Membrane Science & Technol. and Editor-in-chief of Membrane Processes (Applications), a section of the international journal Membranes: Basile also prepared 25 special issues on membrane science and technology for many international journals (IJHE, Chem Eng. J., Cat. Today, etc.). He participated to and was/is responsible of many national and international projects on membrane reactors and membrane science. Basile served as Director of the ITM-CNR during the period Dec. 2008 – May 2009. In the last years, he was tutor of 30 Thesis for master and Ph.D. students at the Chemical Engineering Department of the University of Calabria (Italy). Form 2014, Basile is Full Professor of Chemical Engineering Processes.

Affiliations and Expertise

Senior Researcher, Institute on Membrane Technology (ITM) Italian National Research Council (CNR), Italy

Adolfo Iulianelli Editor

Adolfo Iulianelli, Degree in Chemical Engineering in 2002 at University of Calabria (Italy), obtained his PhD Degree in Chemical and Materials Engineering in 2006 at University of Calabria (Italy). Nowadays, he is working at the Institute on Membrane Technology of the National Research Council of Italy (CNR-ITM). He is author or co-author of more than 50 international articles (ISI), 1 patent, more than 50 contributes as oral and poster presentations in national and international conferences, more than 20 book chapters. Furthermore, he is Reviewer of more than 20 international ICI journals, Invited Speaker in more than 5 international conferences, training school, etc. Subject Editor of the Scientific World Journal, Guest Editor for the International Journal of Hydrogen Energy (ICI) and Journal of Membrane Science and Technology and Associate Editor of International Journal of Membrane Science and Technology. His research interests are membrane reactors, fuel cells, gas separation, hydrogen production from reforming reactions of renewable sources through inorganic membrane reactors and membrane operations. His h-index is 22 (source: www.scoupus.com).

Affiliations and Expertise

ITM-CNR, Italy