Advances in High Temperature Chemistry V3 - 1st Edition - ISBN: 9780120215034, 9780323156967

Advances in High Temperature Chemistry V3

1st Edition

Editors: Leroy Eyring
eBook ISBN: 9780323156967
Imprint: Academic Press
Published Date: 1st January 1971
Page Count: 300
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Description

Advances in High Temperature Chemistry, Volume 3 reviews and evaluates some techniques in high temperature chemistry.
Comprised of six chapters, this volume first discusses the principles concerned with high temperature chemistry. After introducing short-range ordering in crystals, this book shows how to interpret liquid alloy activity measurements. It also covers various techniques such as photoionization mass spectroscopy, photoelectron spectroscopy, and microwave spectroscopy. This book ends with a discussion on oxahalides and other transition elements. Researchers and high temperature chemists will find this book useful.

Table of Contents


Contributors

Foreword

Contents of Previous Volumes

Some Theoretical Significances of High Temperature Chemistry

I. Some Pertinent Activities in High Temperature Chemistry

II. Concepts and Definitions

III. Probability Densities; Significance of ß = 0; High Temperature Physics

IV. Discontinuities and Turning Points; High Temperature Chemistry

References

Short-Range Ordering in Crystals

I. Introduction

II. Order Parameters

III. The Measurement of Order Parameters

IV. Ordering Energies and the Statistical Mechanics of Ordering

V. The Short-Range Ordered State

VI. Long-Range Periodicities and Superlattices

VII. Applications to Nonmetals

VIII. Outstanding Problems

References

Interpreting Liquid Alloy Activity Measurements: A Changing Scientific Paradigm

I. Introduction

II. Thermodynamic Measurements on Liquid Alloys

III. Some Solution Theories

References

Photoionization Mass Spectrometry and Photoelectron Spectroscopy of High Temperature Vapors

I. Introduction

II. Historical Development

III. Modern Photoionization Mass Spectrometry

IV. Comparison of Electron and Photon Impact

V. Interpretation of Threshold Behavior

VI. Results of Recent Photoionization Studies of High Temperature Vapors

VII. Photoelectron Spectroscopy of High Temperature Vapors

VIII. Kinetic Studies—An Aside

References

Microwave Spectroscopy of High Temperature Gases

I. Introduction

II. Experimental Techniques

III. Results for Diatomic Molecules

IV. Comparison of Experimentally Determined Molecular Parameters of Diatomics with ab Initio Results

V. Results on Triatomic Molecules

VI. Prospects for Future Research

References

Gaseous Oxohalides, Hydroxides, and Complex Oxides of Group III and Transition Elements

I. Introduction

II. Metal Mono-oxohalides

III. Metal Dioxohalides

IV. Metal Trioxohalides

V. Complex Binary Oxides : Mn Ox (n ≥ 2)

VI. Conclusion

References

Author Index

Subject Index

Details

No. of pages:
300
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Academic Press 1971
Published:
Imprint:
Academic Press
eBook ISBN:
9780323156967

About the Editor

Leroy Eyring

Affiliations and Expertise

Department of Chemistry and the Center for Solid State Science, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona, USA