Advanced District Heating and Cooling (DHC) Systems - 1st Edition - ISBN: 9781782423744, 9781782423959

Advanced District Heating and Cooling (DHC) Systems

1st Edition

Editors: Robin Wiltshire
eBook ISBN: 9781782423959
Hardcover ISBN: 9781782423744
Imprint: Woodhead Publishing
Published Date: 21st August 2015
Page Count: 364
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Table of Contents

  • List of contributors
  • Part One: Introduction
    • 1: Historical development of district heating and characteristics of a modern district heating system
      • Abstract
      • 1.1 Introduction
      • 1.2 Characteristics of a modern district heating system
      • 1.3 Organisational aspects
      • 1.4 Summary
    • 2: District heating and cooling policies worldwide
      • Abstract
      • 2.1 Introduction
      • 2.2 Issues for discussion
      • 2.3 European Union
      • 2.4 Other Europe an countries
      • 2.5 China
      • 2.6 Other Asian countries
      • 2.7 Russia
      • 2.8 North America
  • Part Two: Energy sources and plant technologies
    • 3: Cogeneration, biomass, waste to energy and industrial waste heat for district heating
      • Abstract
      • 3.1 Introduction
      • 3.2 Thermal energy production by fossil fuel boiler plants for district heating
      • 3.3 CHP produced by engines for district heating
      • 3.4 Large CHP plants for district heating
      • 3.5 Biomass and biogas for district heating
      • 3.6 Waste to energy for district heating
      • 3.7 Using industrial waste heat for district heating
      • 3.8 Conclusion
      • 3.9 Future trends
      • 3.10 Sources of further information
    • 4: Deep geothermal energy for district heating: lessons learned from the U.S. and beyond
      • Abstract
      • 4.1 Introduction
      • 4.2 Technological overview of the use of deep geothermal energy for district heating
      • 4.3 Advantages and challenges of deep geothermal for district heating
      • 4.4 Modeling of deep geothermal district heating systems
      • 4.5 Case studies
      • 4.6 Future trends
      • 4.7 Sources of further information
    • 5: Solar thermal energy for district heating
      • Abstract
      • Acknowledgment
      • 5.1 Introduction
      • 5.2 Technology overview of solar thermal plants for district heating
      • 5.3 Economics
      • 5.4 Future trends
      • 5.5 Sources of further information
    • 6: Energy sources for district heating and cooling
      • Abstract
      • 6.1 Background
      • 6.2 Energy selection priorities
      • 6.3 Energy sources
      • 6.4 Considerations in the use of localized energy
      • 6.5 Energy project examples
      • 6.6 Future trends
    • 7: Energy storage for district energy systems
      • Abstract
      • 7.1 Introduction
      • 7.2 What is thermal energy storage?
      • 7.3 Centralized/decentralized long-term (seasonal) storage used in large scale district energy systems
      • 7.4 Heat production optimization
      • 7.5 Design parameters and operational principles
      • 7.6 Operational schemes (control regimes)
      • 7.7 Charging and discharging of directly connected TES
      • 7.8 Charging and discharging of a pressure separated TES
      • 7.9 Designing a thermal store
      • 7.10 Seasonal thermal storage
      • Case studies
    • 8: District cooling, current status and future trends
      • Abstract
      • 8.1 Introduction
      • 8.2 Technological overview of typical district cooling system
      • 8.3 Central plant configurations
      • 8.4 Chilled water distribution systems
      • 8.5 Building interconnections
      • 8.6 Improving system performance
      • 8.7 Deep water ‘free cooling’ systems case studies
      • 8.8 Future trends
      • 8.9 Ball State University case study
  • Part Three: Component development, operational efficiency improvement and planning
    • 9: New developments in pipes and related network components for district heating
      • Abstract
      • 9.1 Introduction
      • 9.2 Drivers for development
      • 9.3 Pipes
      • 9.4 Joints
      • 9.5 Other components
      • 9.6 Installation methods and excavation work
      • 9.7 Future trends
      • 9.8 Sources of further information
    • 10: New developments in substations for district heating
      • Abstract
      • 10.1 Introduction
      • 10.2 Specification of modern district heating substation
      • 10.3 Interactions with a modern district heating substations
      • 10.4 Standardization of a district heating substations
      • 10.5 Developments in substation components
      • 10.6 Future trends
    • 11: Temperature optimization in district heating systems
      • Abstract
      • 11.1 Introduction
      • 11.2 The connection between district heating temperatures and different parts of the district heating system
      • 11.3 Temperature optimization in district heating systems
      • 11.4 Future trends
      • 11.5 Sources of further information
    • 12: District heating monitoring and control systems
      • Abstract
      • 12.1 Introduction
      • 12.2 Substation architecture
      • 12.3 Control principles
    • 13: Prediction and operational planning in district heating and cooling systems
      • Abstract
      • 13.1 Introduction
      • 13.2 District heating and cooling system
      • 13.3 Thermal load prediction in district heating and cooling systems
      • 13.4 Operational planning of a district heating and cooling plant
      • 13.5 Conclusion
  • Part Four: Business models and urban planning for heat networks
    • 14: Business models for district heating
      • Abstract
      • 14.1 Introduction
      • 14.2 A business model framework
      • 14.3 The business logic of district heating
      • 14.4 Business models on the Swedish market
      • 14.5 Discussion
      • 14.6 Conclusion
    • 15: Development of district heating and cooling in the urban planning context
      • Abstract
      • 15.1 Introduction
      • 15.2 District heating and cooling in a low energy demand context
      • 15.3 District heating and cooling in the multi-energy urban perspective
      • 15.4 Urban planning framework
      • 15.5 Decision-making, planning and implementation
      • 15.6 Conclusion and future trends
  • Index

Description

Advanced District Heating and Cooling (DHC) Systems presents the latest information on the topic, providing valuable information on the distribution of centrally generated heat or cold energy to buildings, usually in the form of space heating, cooling, and hot water.

As DHC systems are more efficient and less polluting than individual domestic or commercial heating and cooling systems, the book provides an introduction to DHC, including its potential contribution to reducing carbon dioxide emissions, then reviews thermal energy generation for DHC, including fossil fuel-based technologies, those based on renewables, and surplus heat valorization. Final sections address methods to improve the efficiency of DHC.

Key Features

  • Gives a comprehensive overview of DHC systems and the technologies and energy resources utilized within these systems
  • Analyzes the various methods used for harnessing energy to apply to DHC systems
  • Ideal resource for those interested in district cooling, teleheating, heat networks, distributed heating, thermal energy, cogeneration, combined heat and power, and CHP
  • Reviews the application of DHC systems in the field, including both the business model side and the planning needed to implement these systems

Readership

Academic researchers working in the district heating and cooling (DHC) field and professionals working on improving and developing DHC systems


Details

No. of pages:
364
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Woodhead Publishing 2016
Published:
Imprint:
Woodhead Publishing
eBook ISBN:
9781782423959
Hardcover ISBN:
9781782423744

Ratings and Reviews


About the Editors

Robin Wiltshire Editor

Affiliations and Expertise

Technical Director at Building Research Establishment (BRE), UK