Guide for Authors

  • The peer review submission system for Biomaterials is located here: http://ees.elsevier.com/biomat/

    The Elsevier Editorial System (EES) is a web-based submission and review system. Authors may submit manuscripts and track their progress through the system to publication. Reviewers can download manuscripts and submit their opinions to the editor. Editors can manage the whole submission/review/revise/publish process.

    Please register at: http://ees.elsevier.com/biomat/

    Referees, whose names are not normally disclosed to the authors, will study all contributions which the Editor-in-Chief deems to be of sufficient significance and interest to be sent for peer review. The criteria by which this initial assessment is made include relevance to the scope of the journal, the originality of the work and its significance to the broad development of the field of biomaterials.

    Before You Begin
    All authors, especially those submitting to the journal for the first time, are encouraged to read the following document authored by the Editor in Chief, which gives an overview of the journal as well as the writing and selection process of academic publishing as it relates to Biomaterials: Writing Papers for Biomaterials.

    Ethics in Publishing: For information on Ethics in Publishing and Ethical guidelines for journal publication see http://www.elsevier.com/authorethics and http://www.elsevier.com/ethicalguidelines.

    Changes to authorship
    This policy concerns the addition, deletion, or rearrangement of author names in the authorship of accepted manuscripts:
    Before the accepted manuscript is published in an online issue: Requests to add or remove an author, or to rearrange the author names, must be sent to the Journal Manager from the corresponding author of the accepted manuscript and must include: (a) the reason the name should be added or removed, or the author names rearranged and (b) written confirmation (e-mail, fax, letter) from all authors that they agree with the addition, removal or rearrangement. In the case of addition or removal of authors, this includes confirmation from the author being added or removed. Requests that are not sent by the corresponding author will be forwarded by the Journal Manager to the corresponding author, who must follow the procedure as described above. Note that: (1) Journal Managers will inform the Journal Editors of any such requests and (2) publication of the accepted manuscript in an online issue is suspended until authorship has been agreed.
    After the accepted manuscript is published in an online issue: Any requests to add, delete, or rearrange author names in an article published in an online issue will follow the same policies as noted above and result in a corrigendum.

    Mandatory Author Declaration: In addition to uploading manuscripts and figures, it is required that the corresponding author of each manuscript uploads a separate Author Declaration. All authors must sign this declaration; the corresponding author may not sign on behalf of other authors.

    This Declaration covers a number of logistic and ethical issues. Please use the template given above for this Declaration. Authors may save this template, obtain the required signatures and then upload it as an integral part of their submission. The editorial process will not begin until and unless all authors have signed the declaration.

    N.B.: The Author Declaration is independent of, and in addition to, the "Journal Publishing Agreement" agreement which is issued on acceptance.

    Amendments to Manuscripts
    In order to maintain the integrity of the scientific record, the version that is published in an issue on ScienceDirect and in print MUST be identical. One set of page proofs will be sent to the corresponding author. Please note that authors are urged to check their proofs carefully before return, but corrections are restricted to typesetting errors only. Proofs are NOT to be considered as drafts. No changes in, or additions to, the accepted (and subsequently edited) manuscript will be allowed at this stage. Proofreading is solely the responsibility of the corresponding author.

    Copyright
    All authors must sign the "Journal Publishing Agreement" before the article can be published. An e-mail (or letter) will be sent to the corresponding author confirming receipt of the manuscript together with an agreement form or a link to the online version of this agreement. This transfer agreement enables Elsevier Ltd to protect the copyrighted material for the authors, but does not relinquish the author's proprietary rights. As an author you (or your employer or institution) retain certain rights; for details you are referred to: http://www.elsevier.com/authorsrights.

    The copyright transfer covers the exclusive rights to reproduce and distribute the article. Subscribers may reproduce tables of contents or prepare lists of articles including abstracts for internal circulation within their institutions. Permission of the Publisher is required for resale or distribution outside the institution and for all other derivative works, including compilations and translations (please consult http://www.elsevier.com/permissions). If excerpts from other copyrighted works are included, the author(s) must obtain written permission from the copyright owners and credit the source(s) in the article. Elsevier has preprinted forms for use by authors in these cases: please consult http://www.elsevier.com/permissions.

    Role of the Funding Source
    You are requested to identify who provided financial support for the conduct of the research and/or preparation of the article and to briefly describe the role of the sponsor(s), if any, in study design; in the collection, analysis and interpretation of data; in the writing of the report; and in the decision to submit the paper for publication. If the funding source(s) had no such involvement then this should be stated. Please see http://www.elsevier.com/funding.

    Funding Bodies Agreements and Policies
    Elsevier has established agreements and developed policies to allow authors whose articles appear in journals published by Elsevier, to comply with potential manuscript archiving requirements as specified as conditions of their grant awards. To learn more about existing agreements and policies please visit http://www.elsevier.com/fundingbodies.

    Open Access

    This journal offers authors two choices to publish their research;

    1. Open Access
    • Articles are freely available to both subscribers and the wider public with permitted reuse
    • An Open Access publication fee is payable by authors or their research funder
    2. Subscription
    • Articles are made available to subscribers as well as developing countries and patient groups through our access programs (http://www.elsevier.com/access)
    • No Open Access publication fee

    All articles published Open Access will be immediately and permanently free for everyone to read and download. Permitted reuse is defined by your choice of one of the following Creative Commons user licenses:

    Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY): lets others distribute and copy the article, to create extracts, abstracts, and other revised versions, adaptations or derivative works of or from an article (such as a translation), to include in a collective work (such as an anthology), to text or data mine the article, even for commercial purposes, as long as they credit the author(s), do not represent the author as endorsing their adaptation of the article, and do not modify the article in such a way as to damage the author's honor or reputation.

    Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-ShareAlike (CC BY-NC-SA): for non-commercial purposes, lets others distribute and copy the article, to create extracts, abstracts and other revised versions, adaptations or derivative works of or from an article (such as a translation), to include in a collective work (such as an anthology), to text and data mine the article, as long as they credit the author(s), do not represent the author as endorsing their adaptation of the article, do not modify the article in such a way as to damage the author's honor or reputation, and license their new adaptations or creations under identical terms (CC BY NC SA).

    Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs (CC-BY-NC-ND): for non-commercial purposes, lets others distribute and copy the article, and to include in a collective work (such as an anthology), as long as they credit the author(s) and provided they do not alter or modify the article.

    To provide Open Access, this journal has a publication fee which needs to be met by the authors or their research funders for each article published Open Access.

    The Open Access publication fee for this journal is $USD 3300, excluding taxes.

    Learn more about Elsevier's pricing policy:http://www.elsevier.com/openaccesspricing

    Manuscript Preparation

    General: Manuscripts must be word processed (preferably in Word format), double-spaced with wide margins and a font size of 12 or 10 pt. Files prepared in LaTEX are not supported. Figure captions should be in Arial font 9pt. Please check the current style of the journal, particularly the reference style (Vancouver), and avoid excessive layout styling as most formatting codes will be removed or replaced during the processing of your article. In addition, do not use options such as automatic word breaking, justified layout, double columns or automatic paragraph numbering (especially for numbered references). However do use bold face, italic, subscripts, superscripts etc. The corresponding author should be identified (include a Fax number and E-mail address). Full postal addresses must be given for all co-authors. The Editors reserve the right to adjust style to certain standards of uniformity. The preferred style is: Surname, Initials, Department, Institution, City/State, Postal Code, Country. Authors should retain copies of all versions of their manuscript submitted to the journal. Authors are especially requested to be vigilant over the submission of the correct version of the manuscript at the various stages of the editorial process.

    English Language: Manuscripts should be proof-read and have English language errors corrected before submission as we may have to return papers due to poor language usage. Authors who require information about language editing and copyediting services pre- and post-submission please visit http://www.elsevier.com/languagepolishing for more information.

    Paper Length: Authors are urged to write as concisely as possible.

    Abstracts: All manuscripts are to be supplied with an Abstract of about 100-200 words in length.

    Keywords: Authors must provide 4-6 keywords for indexing purposes. A keyword list can be found at the end of these instructions. click here).

    Text: Follow this order when typing manuscripts:Title, Authors, Affiliations, Abstract, Keywords, Introduction, Materials and Methods, Results, Discussion, Conclusions, Acknowledgements, References, Appendix (where necessary), Figures, Figure Captions and Tables, Supplementary Data. The corresponding author should be identified with an asterisk and footnote. All other footnotes (except for table footnotes) should be identified with superscript Arabic numbers. An abbreviated title for use as a running headline should also be supplied. Authors are requested to acknowledge funding sources for the work.

    Units: The SI system should be used for all scientific and laboratory data; if, in certain instances, it is necessary to quote other units, these should be added in parentheses. Temperatures should be given in degrees Celsius. The unit 'billion' (109 in America, 1012 in Europe) is ambiguous and must not be used. If a large number of symbols are used it is helpful if authors submit a list of these symbols and their meanings.

    References: All publications cited in the text should be presented in a list of references following the text of the manuscript. In the text refer to references by a number in square brackets on the line (e.g. Since Peterson[1]), and the full reference should be formatted according to the permutation of the Vancouver reference system with numbers in the text. It is suggested that authors refer to the following link for a comprehensive overview of the Vancouver reference styles: Vancouver Reference Styles

    Examples of formatting follow:

    1. Driessens FCM, Boltong MG, Bermudez O, Planell JA. Formulation and setting times of some calcium orthophosphate cements: a pilot study. J Mater Sci: Mater Med 1993;4:503-508.
    2. Nancollas H. In vitro studies of calcium phosphate crystallisation. In: Mann S, Webb J, Williams RJP, editors. Biomineralization. Chemical and biochemical perspectives. New York: VCH, 1989. p. 157-182.
    3. Brown W, Chow LC. Combinations of sparingly soluble calcium phosphates in slurries and paste as mineralizers and cements. US Patent No. 4612053, 1986.

    N.B.: “Et al” must be used after the first 6 authors have been named. Biomaterials does not use the publication month or day.

    Online Sources: References to online sources, including articles in press, should contain at a minimum the full URL and year the source was accessed. Furthermore, if known, the following information should be given: author names, dates, reference to a source publication.

    Examples of formatting follow:

    1. UK House of Commons Science and Technology Committee. Scientific Publications: Free for All? Tenth Report of Session 2003-4 Volume 1. London: The Stationary Office Ltd. Online. 2004 July. Available from URL: http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm200304/cmselect/cmsctech/399/39902.html
    2. Wellcome Trust. Economic Analysis of Scientific Research Publishing. Histon, UK: Wellcome Trust. Online. 2003. Available from URL: http://www.wellcome.ac.uk/doc_wtd003181.html
    3. Keeney M, Lai JH, Yang F. Recent progress in cartilage tissue engineering. Curr Opin Biotechnol. 2011. Available from URL: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21531126 (DOI: 10.1016/j.copbio.2011.04.003).

    Artwork

    Electronic artwork
    General points
    • Make sure you use uniform lettering and sizing of your original artwork.
    • Save text in illustrations as "graphics" or enclose the font.
    • Only use the following fonts in your illustrations: Arial, Courier, Times, Symbol.
    • Number the illustrations according to their sequence in the text.
    • Use a logical naming convention for your artwork files.
    • Provide captions to illustrations separately.
    • Produce images near to the desired size of the printed version.
    • Submit each figure as a separate file.

    A detailed guide on electronic artwork is available on our website: http://www.elsevier.com/artworkinstructions
    You are urged to visit this site; some excerpts from the detailed information are given here.
    Formats
    Regardless of the application used, when your electronic artwork is finalised, please "save as" or convert the images to one of the following formats (note the resolution requirements for line drawings, halftones, and line/halftone combinations given below):
    EPS: Vector drawings. Embed the font or save the text as "graphics".
    TIFF: color or grayscale photographs (halftones): always use a minimum of 300 dpi.
    TIFF: Bitmapped line drawings: use a minimum of 1000 dpi.
    TIFF: Combinations bitmapped line/half-tone (color or grayscale): a minimum of 500 dpi is required.
    DOC, XLS or PPT: If your electronic artwork is created in any of these Microsoft Office applications please supply "as is".
    Please do not:
    • Supply embedded graphics in your wordprocessor (spreadsheet, presentation) document;
    • Supply files that are optimised for screen use (like GIF, BMP, PICT, WPG); the resolution is too low;
    • Supply files that are too low in resolution;
    • Submit graphics that are disproportionately large for the content.

    Color artwork
    Please make sure that artwork files are in an acceptable format (TIFF, EPS or MS Office files) and with the correct resolution. If, together with your accepted article, you submit usable color figures then Elsevier will ensure, at no additional charge, that these figures will appear in color on the Web (e.g., ScienceDirect and other sites) regardless of whether or not these illustrations are reproduced in color in the printed version. For color reproduction in print, you will receive information regarding the costs from Elsevier after receipt of your accepted article. Please indicate your preference for color in print or on the Web only. For further information on the preparation of electronic artwork, please see http://www.elsevier.com/artworkinstructions. Please note: Because of technical complications which can arise by converting color figures to "gray scale" (for the printed version should you not opt for color in print) please submit in addition usable black and white versions of all the color illustrations.

    Video Data
    Elsevier accepts video material and animation sequences to support and enhance your scientific research. Authors who have video or animation files that they wish to submit with their article are strongly encouraged to include these within the body of the article. This can be done in the same way as a figure or table by referring to the video or animation content and noting in the body text where it should be placed. All submitted files should be properly labeled so that they directly relate to the video file's content. In order to ensure that your video or animation material is directly usable, please provide the files in one of our recommended file formats with a maximum size of 30 MB and running time of 5 minutes. Video and animation files supplied will be published online in the electronic version of your article in Elsevier Web products, including ScienceDirect: http://www.sciencedirect.com. Please supply 'stills' with your files: you can choose any frame from the video or animation or make a separate image. These will be used instead of standard icons and will personalize the link to your video data. For more detailed instructions please visit our video instruction pages at http://www.elsevier.com/artworkinstructions. Note: since video and animation cannot be embedded in the print version of the journal, please provide text for both the electronic and the print version for the portions of the article that refer to this content. Files can be stored on diskette, ZIP-disk or CD (either MS-DOS or Macintosh).Audio Slides: The journal encourages authors to create an AudioSlides presentation with their published article. AudioSlides are brief, webinar-style presentations that are shown next to the online article on ScienceDirect. This gives authors the opportunity to summarize their research in their own words and to help readers understand what the paper is about. More information and examples are available at http://www.elsevier.com/audioslides. Authors of this journal will automatically receive an invitation e-mail to create an AudioSlides presentation after acceptance of their paper.

    After Acceptance

    Proofs: One set of page proofs in PDF format will be sent by e-mail to the corresponding author and should be returned within 48 hours of receipt. The average amount of time between acceptance and receipt of typeset proof is 6 working days. Papers are published in print within another 8 weeks upon receipt of author corrections. Corrections should be restricted to typesetting errors. Any queries should be answered in full. Please note that authors are urged to check their proofs carefully before return.

    Elsevier now sends PDF proofs which can be annotated; for this you will need to download Adobe Reader© version 7 (or higher) available free from http://www.adobe.com/products/acrobat/readstep2.html. Instructions on how to annotate PDF files will accompany the proofs. The exact system requirements are given at the Adobe site: http://www.adobe.com/products/acrobat/acrrsystemreqs.html#70win. If you do not wish to use the PDF annotations function, you may list the corrections (including replies to the Query Form) and return to Elsevier in an e-mail. Please list your corrections quoting line number. If, for any reason, this is not possible, then mark the corrections and any other comments (including replies to the Query Form) on a printout of your proof and return by fax, or scan the pages and e-mail, or by post. Please use this proof only for checking the typesetting, editing, completeness and correctness of the text, tables and figures. Significant changes to the article as accepted for publication will only be considered at this stage with permission from the Editor. We will do everything possible to get your article published quickly and accurately. Therefore, it is important to ensure that all of your corrections are sent back to us in one communication: please check carefully before replying, as inclusion of any subsequent corrections cannot be guaranteed. Proofreading is solely your responsibility. Note that Elsevier may proceed with the publication of your article if no response is received.

    Track a Paper: Authors can track their paper status online after the paper has been accepted and forwarded to the Publisher. Enter your Elsevier reference number (JBMT xxx) and the Corresponding author's family name at the following web page: http://www.elsevier.com/trackarticle. Corresponding authors will receive an acknowledgement email from Elsevier with the reference number and the family name on it. Authors can also go to the 'track a paper' page by clicking onto the 'track a paper' button on the left hand side of the journal home page.

    Offprints: The corresponding author will be provided with a PDF of the article via email. The PDF is a watermarked version of the published article and includes a cover sheet with the journal cover image and a disclaimer outlining the terms of use. Additional paper offprints can be ordered by the authors. An order form with prices will be sent to the corresponding author.

    Author Enquiries: For enquiries relating to the submission of articles (including electronic submission where available) please visit this journal’s homepage. You can track accepted articles at http://www.elsevier.com/trackarticle and set up e-mail alerts to inform you of when an article’s status has changed. Also accessible from here is information on copyright, frequently asked questions and more. Contact details for questions arising after acceptance of an article, especially those relating to proofs, will be provided by the publisher.

    Keywords">Keyword List

    Back to Instructions

    A
    Abdomen
    Abrasion
    Absorption
    Acid phosphatase
    Acrylic acid
    Acrylics
    Actin
    Activated charcoal
    Activation energy
    Adenovirus
    Adhesion
    Adhesion mechanism
    Adhesion molecule
    Adipose tissue engineering
    Adsorption
    AFM (atomic force microscopy)
    Affinity
    Age / ageing
    Albumin
    Alginate
    Alkaline phosphatase
    Allergy
    Allogeneic cell
    Alumina
    Aluminium
    Ames test
    Amino acid
    Aneurysm
    Angiogenesis
    Animal model
    Anodic phenomena
    Anti-adhesion
    Antibacterial
    Anticoagulant
    Antigenicity
    Antimicrobial
    Antioxidant
    Antisense
    Apatite structure
    Apolipoprotein
    Apoptosis
    Aragonite
    Arterial structure
    Arterial tissue engineering
    Arthritis
    Arthroplasty
    Astrocyte
    Audiology
    Autoimmunity
    Autologous cell

    B
    Bacteria
    Bacterial adhesion
    Bioabsorption
    Bioactive glass
    Bioactivity
    Bioartificial liver
    Bioartificial pancreas
    Biocompatibility
    Biodegradation
    Bioerosion
    Biofilm
    Biomimetic material
    Biomineralisation
    Bioprosthesis
    Bioreactor
    Bioresorption
    Biosensor
    Bis-phenol A derivative
    Bladder
    Bladder tissue engineering
    Blood
    Blood compatibility
    Blood flow
    BMP (bone morphogenetic protein)
    Bone
    Bone cement
    Bone graft
    Bone healing
    Bone ingrowth
    Bone marrow
    Bone regeneration
    Bone remodelling
    Bone repair
    Bone tissue engineering
    Brain
    Brittleness
    Brushite
    Burn

    C
    Calcification
    Calcite
    Calcium
    Calcium carbonate
    Calcium phosphate
    Calcium phosphate cement
    Calcium phosphate coating
    Carbon
    Carcinogenesis
    Cardiac rhythm
    Cardiac tissue engineering
    Cardiomyocyte
    Cartilage
    Cartilage tissue engineering
    Casting
    Catheter
    Catheter infection
    Cell activation
    Cell adhesion
    Cell culture
    Cell encapsulation
    Cell morphology
    Cell proliferation
    Cell signalling
    Cell spreading
    Cell viability
    Cellulose
    Ceramic structure
    Chemiluminescence
    Chemotaxis
    Chemotherapy
    Chinese herbal medicine
    Chitin / chitosan
    Chondrocyte
    Chondroitin sulphate
    Clotting
    Coagulation
    Cobalt alloy
    Co-culture
    Collagen
    Collagen structure
    Complement
    Compliance
    Composite
    Compression
    Computational fluid dynamics
    Confocal microscopy
    Connective tissue
    Constitutive modelling
    Contact angle
    Contact lens
    Contact phase activation
    Controlled drug release
    Copolymer
    Copper
    Cornea
    Corrosion
    Corrosion product
    Coupling agent
    Crack
    Creep
    Crevice corrosion
    Cross-linking
    Crystal growth
    Crystallinity
    Crystallisation
    Crystallography
    Cyclooxygenase
    Cytokine
    Cytotoxicity

    D
    Degradation
    Demineralisation
    Dendrimer
    Dental adhesive
    Dental alloy
    Dental amalgam
    Dental cement
    Dental implant
    Dental restorative material
    Dentine
    Dentine bonding agent
    Dermis
    Dextran
    Diabetes
    Dialysis
    Diamond
    Dielectric constant
    DMA (dynamic mechanical analysis)
    DNA
    Drug delivery
    Drug release
    DSC (differential scanning calorimetry)
    Dura

    E
    ECM (extracellular matrix)
    Elasticity
    Elastin
    Elastomer
    Electrical stimulation
    Electroactive polymer
    Electrochemistry
    Electrode
    Electron beam
    Electron microscopy
    Electronic material
    Electrophysiology
    ELISA
    Ellipsometry
    Embolisation
    Endodontics
    Endothelial cell
    Endothelialisation
    Endothelium
    Endotoxin
    ENT surgery
    Enzyme
    Epithelial cell
    Epithelium
    ESCA (electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis)
    Esterase
    Extracorporeal circulation
    Extrusion

    F
    FACS (fluorescence activated cell sorting)
    Fatigue
    Ferroelectrics
    Fibrin
    Fibrinogen
    Fibroblast
    Fibroblast growth factor
    Fibronectin
    Fibrosis
    Fibrous tissue
    Finite element analysis
    Flow cytometry
    Fluorine - fluoride
    Fluorescence
    Fluorocarbon
    Foreign body giant cell
    Foreign body response
    Fractal
    Fracture mechanism
    Fracture toughness
    Free form fabrication
    Free radical
    Fretting
    Friction
    FTIR
    Fungal infection

    G
    Gamma irradiation
    Gelatin
    Gene expression
    Gene therapy
    Gene transfer
    Genetic engineering
    Genotoxicity
    Glass
    Glass ceramic
    Glass ionomer
    Glass transition temperature
    Glaucoma
    Glycosaminoglycan
    Gold
    Growth factors

    H
    Haemocompatibility
    Haemodialysis
    Haemolysis
    Haemostasis
    Hair follicle
    Heart
    Heart assist
    Heart valve
    Heparin
    Hepatocyte
    Hip replacement prosthesis
    Histomorphometry
    Hyaluronic acid / hyaluronan
    Hydrogel
    Hydrolysis
    Hydrophilicity
    Hydrophobin
    Hydroxyapatite
    Hydroxyapatite coating
    Hydroxyapatite composite
    Hydroxyapatite - drug
    Hydroxyethylmethacrlate
    Hydroxyproline
    Hypersensitivity

    I
    Image analysis
    Immune response
    Immunochemistry
    Immunomodulation
    Immunostimulation
    In situ hybridisation
    In vitro test
    In vivo test
    Infection
    Inflammation
    Infrared spectrum
    Integrin
    Interface
    Interleukin
    Intervertebral disc
    Intimal hyperplasia
    Intraocular lens
    Intravascular stent
    IPN (Interpenetrating polymer network)
    Ion beam
    Ion implantation
    Iridium
    Islet

    J
    Joint replacement

    K
    Keratin
    Keratinocyte
    Keratoprosthesis
    Knee replacement

    L
    Laminin
    Langmuir Blodgett film
    Laser
    Laser ablation
    Laser manufacturing
    Latex
    Leukocyte
    Ligament
    Ligament prosthesis
    Lipase
    Lipid
    Liposome
    Liquid crystal
    Liver
    Liver perfusion
    Lung
    Lymphocyte
    Lymphokine
    Lysozyme

    M
    Macrophage
    Magnesium
    Magnetism
    Matrix metalloproteinase
    Mechanical properties
    Mechanical test
    Membrane
    Mercury
    Mesenchcymal stem cell
    Metal ion
    Metal ion release
    Metal ion toxicity
    Metal - ceramic bonding
    Metal surface treatment
    Metallography
    Metalloproteinase
    Micelle
    Microbiology
    Microcapsule
    Microencapsulation
    Micromachining
    Micromotion
    Micropatterning
    Microsphere
    Microstructure
    Microwave
    Middle ear
    Modelling
    Molecular biology
    Molecular imaging
    Molecular modelling
    Molecular weight
    Monocyte
    Monomer
    MRI (magnetic resonance imaging)
    mRNA
    MTT assay
    Mucosa
    Mucosal adhesion
    Muscle
    Mutagenicity

    N
    Nacre
    Nanocomposite
    Nanoindentation
    Nanoparticle
    Nanotopography
    Neointima
    Nerve
    Nerve growth factor
    Nerve guide
    Nerve regeneration
    Nerve tissue engineering
    Neural cell
    Neural network
    Neural prosthesis
    Neutrophil
    Nickel
    Nickel-titanium alloy
    Nitinol
    Nitric oxide
    Non-woven fabric

    O
    Ophthalmology
    Organ culture
    Orthodontics
    Osseointegration
    Osteoblast
    Osteoclast
    Osteoconduction
    Osteogenesis
    Osteolysis
    Osteopontin
    Osteoporosis
    Oxidation
    Oxygen permeation
    Oxygenation

    P
    Pacemaker
    Palladium
    Pancreas
    Particulates
    Passivation
    Pathology
    PCR (polymerase chain reaction)
    Peptide
    Percutaneous implant
    Periodontium
    Peritoneum
    Phospholipid
    Phosphorylcholine
    Photolithography
    Photopolymerisation
    Photosensitisation
    Phthalate
    Pitting
    Plasma
    Plasma polymerisation
    Plasma proteins
    Plasma spraying
    Plasminogen
    Plasticisation
    Plasticity
    Platelet
    Platelet activation
    Platelet adhesion
    Platinum
    Pluronics
    Polyacrylic acid
    Polyacrylonitrile
    Polyamino acid
    Polyanhydride
    Polycaprolactone
    Polycarbonate
    Polydioxanone
    Polydimethylsiloxane
    Polyetheretherketone
    Polyethylene
    Polyethylene oxide
    Polyethylene terephthalate
    Polyglycolic acid
    PolyHEMA
    Polyhydroxybutyric acid
    Polylactic acid
    Polymerisation
    Polymethylmethacrylate
    Polyorthoester
    Polypropylene
    Polysaccharide
    Polysulphone
    Polytetrafluoroethylene
    Polyurethane
    Polyvinylalcohol
    Polyvinylchloride
    Porcine tissue
    Porosity
    Primitive cell
    Progenitor cell
    Protein
    Protein adsorption

    R
    Radiopacity
    Rapid prototyping
    Recombinant protein
    Reproductive toxicity
    Restenosis
    Retina
    RGD peptide

    S
    SBF (simulated body fluids)
    Scaffold
    Schwann cell
    Selectin
    Self assembly
    SEM (scanning electron microscopy)
    Shape memory
    Shear
    Signal transducing mediator
    Silane
    Silica
    Silicate
    Silicon
    Silicon carbide
    Silicon nitride
    Silicone
    Silicone fluid
    Silicone gel
    Silicone elastomer
    Silk
    Siloxane
    Silver
    SIMS (secondary ion mass spectroscopy)
    SIS (small intestine submucosa)
    Smooth muscle cell
    Soft tissue biomechanics
    Sol-gel techniques)
    Spinal surgery
    Stainless steel
    Starch
    Steel
    Stem cell
    Stent
    Sterilisation
    Strain rate
    Stress analysis
    Stress cracking
    Sulphonated polymer
    Superelasticity
    Superoxide
    Surface analysis
    Surface energy
    Surface grafting
    Surface modification
    Surface roughness
    Surface texture
    Surface topography
    Surface treatment
    Surgical mesh
    Suture
    Swelling

    T
    Tantalum
    TEM (transmission electron microscopy)
    Tendon
    Tendon prosthesis
    Tension
    TGF (transforming growth factor)
    Thermally responsive material
    Thiol
    Three dimensional printing
    Thrombin
    Thrombogenicity
    Thrombomodulin
    Thrombosis
    Tissue adhesive
    Tissue plasminogen activator
    Titanium
    Titanium alloy
    Titanium oxide
    Tracheal prosthesis
    Transplantation

    U
    Urinary tract

    V
    Vascular grafts
    Vinculin
    Viscoelasticity
    VWF (von Willibrand factor)

    W
    Wear debris
    Wear mechanism
    Wettability
    Wollastonite
    Wound closure
    Wound dressing
    Wound healing

    X
    Xenotransplantation
    Xerogel
    XRD (x-ray diffraction)
    XPS (x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy)

    Z
    Zinc
    Zirconia

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