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Olivier Dumon in Huffington Post: 'Running the business of science'

An Elsevier managing director writes about how science impacts the global economy — and the publisher's role in making sure it's presented accurately

[caption id="attachment_14714" align="alignright" width="210"]Olivier Dumon (Photo by Zakelijk Portret) Olivier Dumon joined Elsevier in February 2012 as Managing Director of Academic and Government Markets. Previously, he served as VP of Product Management for AT&T Interactive and Senior Director of Search for eBay.[/caption] In the Huffington Post blog Friday, Olivier Dumon, Elsevier's Managing Director of Academic and Government Markets, writes about how science impacts all aspects of the global economy — and the disastrous consequence that can ensue when information is improperly vetted.

After giving examples of the economic impact of science — "the billions invested in medical research that will generate the next class of biomedical and pharmaceutical breakthroughs. Or the analysis of climatologists about weather patterns that global commodity markets depend upon, and the physicists and engineers researching the next big thing in aerodynamics and personal computing" — Dumon states that "probably no other business relies on publishing the way science does."

He focuses on the publisher's responsibility to vet information properly through "vigorous and disciplined peer-review standards."

As an example of what can happen when peer review is not conducted properly, he cites the misleading statements in an economics paper that was used by politicians in several leading industrial economies to justify austerity measures — an instance that even became fodder for TV satirist Stephen Colbert

In Dumon's words:

More than any other business, science has a responsibility to employ trusted vetting processes in order to ensure the veracity of research findings. Anything less than the highest standards could have potentially disastrous and long-ranging consequences ...
Read the full article in the Huffington Post blog.


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