Time, Internal Clocks and Movement book cover

Time, Internal Clocks and Movement

Interest in the concept of time has a long history and has been a topic of study for a wide range of investigators. No change can take place without specification of time. While philosophers and physicists have been intrigued by the concept of subjective perception of time and its relationship to real time, natural scientists have been concerned mainly with investigating time as a factor in understanding the behaviour of animals from the migratory habits of birds to the periodical breeding cycles. The immense bulk of temporal perception studies, the variety of approaches, methods of measurement and even terminology has led to a difficulty in reaching a global interpretation of the results.

This book aims to give an integrative approach of time sense and to focus the analysis on temporal factors in the processing of movement, trying to link temporal perception studies in the final common pathway, that is motion. To give some clues of human brain integrative processes at higher levels. And, finally, to clarify the neurophysiological substrate of these operations.

Included in series
Advances in Psychology

Hardbound, 309 Pages

Published: June 1996

Imprint: North-holland

ISBN: 978-0-444-82114-0

Contents

  • Neurophysiological mechanisms of temporal perception (J. Artieda, M.A. Pastor). Processing of temporal information in the brain (C.E. Carr, S. Amagai). Large-scale integration of cortical information processing (S.L. Bressler). Models of neural timing (C. Miall). Neuronal mechanisms of biological rhythms (H. Arechiga). Human vs. animal time (J. Campbell). Time and psycho-physical integration (R. Alvira). The role of attention in time estimation processes (D. Zakay, R.A. Block). Reconstruction of subjective time on the basis of a hierarchically organized processing system (E. Pöppel). Time perception measurements in neuropsychology (P. Nichelli). The development of central pattern generators for vertebrate locomotion (K.T. Sillar). An hierarchical model of motor timing (B.L. Day). Involvement of the basal ganglia in timing perceptual and motor tasks (M.A. Pastor, J. Artieda). Exploring the domain of the cerebellar timing system (S. Clarke, R. Ivry, J. Grinband, S. Roberts, N. Shimizu). Timing in perceptual and motor tasks after disturbances of the brain (N. Von Steinbüchel, M. Wittmann, E. Pöppel). Author index. Subject index.

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