The Internet and Its Protocols book cover

The Internet and Its Protocols

A Comparative Approach

The view presented in The Internet and Its Protocols is at once broad and deep. It covers all the common protocols and how they combine to create the Internet in its totality. More importantly, it describes each one completely, examining the requirements it addresses and the exact means by which it does its job. These descriptions include message flows, full message formats, and message exchanges for normal and error operation. They are supported by numerous diagrams and tables.This book's comparative approach gives you something more valuable: insight into the decisions you face as you build and maintain your network, network device, or network application. Author Adrian Farrel’s experience and advice will dramatically smooth your path as you work to offer improved performance and a wider range of services.

Audience
Networking professionals, i.e., applications programmers, hardware/software developers, systems testers, network managers and network operators

Hardbound, 840 Pages

Published: April 2004

Imprint: Morgan Kaufmann

ISBN: 978-1-55860-913-6

Reviews

  • "Not only is this book thorough in covering the networking technologies and the applications of today’s communications networks, it also guides you to comprehensive understanding of problems and solutions. This should be mandatory reading for every professional in our business." --Loa Andersson, TLA-group, IETF MPLS working group co-chair. "Before this book, one would need to search through dozens of resources to find such a complete picture of the common Internet protocols. I for one will be keeping a copy of this book on my desk, as well as making this text required reading in the networking courses I teach." --Thomas D. Nadeau, Technical Leader, Cisco Systems, Inc., and Adjunct Professor of Computer Science, University of Massachusetts

Contents

  • 1 OVERVIEW OF ESSENTIALS1.1 PHYSICAL CONNECTIVITY1.2 PROTOCOLS AND ADDRESSING1.3 THE OSI SEVEN LAYER MODEL1.4 AN ARCHITECTURE FOR THE NETWORK1.5 PACKAGING DATA1.6 DATA LINK PROTOCOLS1.7 THE PROTOCOLS AT A GLANCE1.8 FURTHER READING2 THE INTERNET PROTOCOL2.1 CHOOSING TO USE IP2.2 IPV42.3 IPV4 ADDRESSING2.4 IP IN USE2.5 IP OPTIONS AND ADVANCED FUNCTIONS2.6 INTERNET CONTROL MESSAGE PROTOCOL (ICMP) 2.7 FURTHER READING3 MULTICAST3.1 CHOOSING UNICAST OR MULTICAST3.2 MULTICAST ADDRESSING AND FORWARDING3.3 INTERNET GROUP MANAGEMENT PROTOCOL (IGMP) 3.4FURTHER READING4 IP VERSION SIX4.1 IPV6 ADDRESSES4.2 PACKET FORMATS4.3 OPTIONS4.4 CHOOSING BETWEEN IPV4 AND IPV64.5 FURTHER READING5 ROUTING5.1 ROUTING AND FORWARDING5.2 DISTRIBUTING ROUTING INFORMATION5.3 COMPUTING PATHS5.4 ROUTING INFORMATION PROTOCOL (RIP) 5.5 OPEN SHORTEST PATH FIRST (OSPF) 5.6 IS-IS5.7 CHOOSING BETWEEN IS-IS AND OSPF5.8 BORDER GATEWAY PROTOCOL 4 (BGP-4) 5.9 MULTICAST ROUTING5.10 OTHER ROUTING PROTOCOLS5.11 FURTHER READING6 IP SERVICE MANAGEMENT6.1 CHOOSING HOW TO MANAGE SERVICES6.2 DIFFERENTIATED SERVICES6.3 INTEGRATED SERVICES6.4 RESERVING RESOURCES USING RSVP6.5 FURTHER READING7 TRANSPORT OVER IP7.1 WHAT IS A TRANSPORT PROTOCOL?7.2 USER DATAGRAM PROTOCOL (UDP)7.3 TRANSMISSION CONTROL PROTOCOL (TCP)7.4 STREAM CONTROL TRANSMISSION PROTOCOL (SCTP)7.5 THE REAL-TIME TRANSPORT PROTOCOL (RTP)7.6 FURTHER READING8 TRAFFIC ENGINEERING8.1 WHAT IS IP TRAFFIC ENGINEERING?8.2 EQUAL COST MULTIPATH8.3 MODIFYING PATH COSTS8.4 ROUTING IP FLOWS8.5 SERVICE BASED ROUTING8.6 CHOOSING OFFLINE OR DYNAMIC TRAFFIC ENGINEERING8.7 DISCOVERING NETWORK UTILIZATION8.8 ROUTING EXTENSIONS FOR TRAFFIC ENGINEERING8.9 CHOOSING TO USE TRAFFIC ENGINEERING8.10 FURTHER READING9 MULTIPROTOCOL LABEL SWITCHING9.1 LABEL SWITCHING9.2 MPLS FUNDAMENTALS9.3 SIGNALING PROTOCOLS9.4 LABEL DISTRIBUTION PROTOCOL (LDP)9.5 TRAFFIC ENGINEERING IN MPLS9.6 CR-LDP9.7 RSVP-TE9.8 CHOOSING BETWEEN CR-LDP AND RSVP-TE9.9 PRIORITIZING TRAFFIC IN MPLS9.10 BGP-4 AND MPLS9.11 FURTHER READING10 GENERALIZED MPLS (GMPLS)10.1 A HIERARCHY OF MEDIA10.2 GENERIC SIGNALING EXTENSIONS FOR GMPLS10.3 CHOOSING RSVP-TE OR CR-LDP IN GMPLS10.4 GENERALIZED RSVP-TE10.5 GENERALIZED CR-LDP10.6 HIERARCHIES AND BUNDLES10.7 OSPF AND IS-IS IN GMPLS10.8 OPTICAL VPNS10.9LINK MANAGEMENT PROTOCOL10.10 FURTHER READING11 SWITCHES AND COMPONENTS11.1 GENERAL SWITCH MANAGEMENT PROTOCOL11.2 SEPARATING IP CONTROL AND FORWARDING11.3 LMP-WDM11.4 FURTHER READING12 APPLICATION PROTOCOLS12.1 WHAT IS AN APPLICATION?12.2 CHOOSING A TRANSPORT12.3 DOMAIN NAME SYSTEM12.4 TELNET12.5 FILE TRANSFER PROTOCOL12.6 HYPER-TEXT TRANSFER PROTOCOL12.7 CHOOSING AN APPLICATION PROTOCOL12.8 FURTHER READING13 NETWORK MANAGEMENT13.1 CHOOSING TO MANAGE YOUR NETWORK13.2 CHOOSING A CONFIGURATION METHOD13.3 THE MANAGEMENT INFORMATION BASE (MIB)13.4 THE SIMPLE NETWORK MANAGEMENT PROTOCOL13.5 EXTENSIBLE MARKUP LANGUAGE13.6 COMMON OBJECT REQUEST BROKER ARCHITECTURE13.7 CHOOSING A CONFIGURATION PROTOCOL13.8 CHOOSING TO COLLECT STATISTICS13.9 COMMON OPEN POLICY SERVICE PROTOCOL13.10 FURTHER READING14 CONCEPTS IN IP SECURITY14.1 THE NEED FOR SECURITY14.2 CHOOSING WHERE TO APPLY SECURITY14.3 COMPONENTS OF SECURITY MODELS14.5 TRANSPORT LAYER SECURITY14.6 SECURING THE HYPERTEXT TRANSFER PROTOCOL14.7 HASHING AND ENCRYPTION: ALGORITHMS AND KEYS14.8 EXCHANGING KEYS14.8.1 Internet Key Exchange14.9 FURTHER READING15 ADVANCED APPLICATIONS15.1 IP ENCAPSULATION15.2 VIRTUAL PRIVATE NETWORKS (VPN)15.3 MOBILE IP15.4 HEADER COMPRESSION15.5 VOICE OVER IP15.6 IP TELEPHONY15.7 IP AND ATM15.8 IP OVER DIAL-UP LINKS15.9 FURTHER READINGCONCLUDING REMARKS

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