Photoperiodism in Plants

By

  • Brian Thomas
  • Daphne Vince-Prue

Photoperiodism is the response to the length of the day that enables living organisms to adapt to seasonal changes in their environment as well as latitudinal variation. As such, it is one of the most significant andcomplex aspects of the interaction between plants and their environment and is a major factor controlling their growth and development. As the new and powerful technologies of molecular genetics are brought to bear on photoperiodism, it becomes particularly important to place new work in the context of the considerable amount of physiological information which already exists on the subject. This innovative book will be of interest to a wide range of plant scientists, from those interested in fundamental plant physiology and molecular biology to agronomists and crop physiologists.
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Audience

Ideal for a wide range of plant scientists, from those interested in fundamental plant physiology and molecular biology to agronomists and crop physiologists.

 

Book information

  • Published: October 1996
  • Imprint: ACADEMIC PRESS
  • ISBN: 978-0-12-688490-6


Table of Contents

Introduction.Photoperiodic Control of Flower Initiation:A General Outline.Photoperiodic Timekeeping.Photoperiodic Photoreceptors.Day-Length Perception in Short-Day Plants.Day-Length Perception in Long-Day Plants.The Physiology of Photoperiodic Floral Induction.The Nature and Identity of Photoperiodic Signals.Biochemical and Molecular Aspects of Photoperiodism.Genetic Approaches to Photoperiodism.Photoperiodic Control of Development:Floral Expression.Dormancy in Woody Plants.Vegetative Propagation.Other Effects of Day-Length.Appendix 1: Photoperiodic Classification of Plants.Appendix 2: Effects of Day-Length on the Content of Endogenous Growth Substances.