Mims' Pathogenesis of Infectious Disease

By

  • Anthony Nash, University of Edinburgh, UK
  • Cedric Mims, Guy's Hospital Medical School, UMDS, London, U.K.
  • John Stephen, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, U.K.

Mims' Pathogenesis of Infectious Disease is the landmark book in the field of infectious disease. The new, revised edition of this work provides a comprehensive, up-to-date description of the mechanisms of microbial infection and the pathogenesis of infectious disease. Presented in a clear, accessible style, it deals in an integrated manner with the spectrum of microorganisms, describing the factors common to all infectious diseases. Molecular biology, pathology, and immunology are brought together to explain the mechanisms for spread, immune response, and recovery.
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Audience

Undergraduate and graduate students in microbiology and immunology, medical students, and others new to the field of microbiology and infectious diseases.

 

Book information

  • Published: September 2000
  • Imprint: ACADEMIC PRESS
  • ISBN: 978-0-12-498264-2

Reviews

Praise for the previous editions: "This is an outstanding book of high scholarship of much interest to immunologists, microbiologists, pathologists and all those concerned with infectious diseases." -Molecular Medicine Today "A splendidly imaginative book which will become a trusty companion for many of us." - The Lancet "An excellent book which should be read by teachers, students, and research workers." - New Scientist



Table of Contents


Preface to the Fifth Edition

Preface to the Fourth Edition

Preface to the Third Edition

Preface to the Second Edition

Preface to the First Edition

1 General Principles

References

2 Attachment to and Entry of Microorganisms into the Body

Introduction

Adhesion/Entry: Some General Considerations

The Skin

Respiratory Tract

Gastro-Intestinal Tract

Oropharynx

Urinogenital Tract

Conjunctiva

The Normal Microbial Flora

Exit of Microorganisms From the Body

References

3 Events Occurring Immediately After the Entry of the Microorganism

Growth in Epithelial Cells

Intracellular Microorganisms and Spread through the Body

Subepithelial Invasion

Nutritional Requirements of Invading Microbes

References

4 The Encounter with the Phagocytic Cell and the Microbe's Answers

Cell Biology of Phagocytosis

Phagocytosis in Polymorphonuclear Leucocytes

Phagocytosis in Macrophages

Microbial Strategy in Relation to Phagocytes

Growth in the Phagocytic Cell

Killing the Phagocyte

Entry into the Host Cell Other than by Phagocytosis

Consequences of Defects in the Phagocytic Cell

Summary

References

5 The Spread of Microbes through the Body

Direct Spread

Microbial Factors Promoting Spread

Spread via Lymphatics

Spread via the Blood

Spread via Other Pathways

References

6 The Immune Response to Infection

Antibody Response

T-Cell-Mediated Immune Response

Natural Killer Cells

Macrophages, Polymorphs and Mast Cells

Complement and Related Defense Molecules

Conclusions Concerning the Immune Response to Microorganisms

References

7 Microbial Strategies in Relation to the Immune Response

Infection Completed before the Adaptive Immune Response Intervenes

Induction of Immunological Tolerance

Immunosuppression

Absence of a Suitable Target for the Immune Response

Microbial Presence in Bodily Sites Inaccessible to the Immune Response

Induction of Inappropriate Antibody and T-Cell Responses

Antibodies Mopped Up by Soluble Microbial Antigens

Local Interference with Immune Forces

Reduced Interferon Induction or Responsiveness

Antigenic Variation

Microorganisms that Avoid Induction of an Immune Response

References

8 Mechanisms of Cell and Tissue Damage

Infection with no Cell or Tissue Damage

Direct Damage by Microorganisms

Microbial Toxins

Indirect Damage via Inflammation

Indirect Damage via the Immune Response (Immunopathology)

Other Indirect Mechanisms of Damage

Diarrhoea

References

9 Recovery from Infection

Immunological Factors in Recovery

Inflammation

Complement

Interferons

Multimechanistic Recovery: An Example

Temperature

Tissue Repair

Resistance to Re-Infection

References

10 Failure to Eliminate Microbe

Latency

Persistent Infection with Shedding

Epidemiological Significance of Persistent Infection with Shedding

Persistent Infection without Shedding

Significance for the Individual of Persistent Infections

Conclusions

References

11 Host and Microbial Factors Influencing

Susceptibility

Genetic Factors in the Microorganism

Genetic Factors in the Host

Hormonal Factors and Stress

Other Factors

References

12 Vaccines and How they Work

Introduction

General Principles

Complications and Side Effects of Vaccines

The Development of New Vaccines

References

Appendix

Conclusions

References

Glossary

Index