Microsystems for Bioelectronics

the Nanomorphic Cell

By

  • Victor V. Zhirnov, Research Associate Professor, North Carolina State University and Research Scientist, Semiconductor Research Corporation
  • Victor V. Zhirnov, Research Associate Professor, North Carolina State University and Research Scientist, Semiconductor Research Corporation
  • Ralph K. Cavin III, Vice President for Research Operations, Semiconductor Research Corporation
  • Ralph K. Cavin III, Vice President for Research Operations, Semiconductor Research Corporation

Microsystems for Bioelectronics is the ultimate guide in the biomedical application industry. It provides a physics-based assessment of the limitless potential of miniaturization technologies. This book goes far beyond the complete design of the final systems. It also discusses the developments of computation and communication subsystems. The future of this technology lies in understanding the scaling limits for the individual systems. This includes all of its components and the fundamental energy source that powers all autonomous microsystems. 
Rapid advances in microfabrication technologies are offering new opportunities and capabilities to develop systems for biomedical applications. These applications include the diagnostics community and those that are active in therapy services. Microsystems for Bioelectronics is one of the only books on the market today that goes into the comprehensive treatment of integrated microsystems.
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Audience

Practicing engineers and scientists who are involved in research and development for integrated microsystems, including biolelectronic and biomedical devices.

 

Book information

  • Published: November 2010
  • Imprint: WILLIAM ANDREW
  • ISBN: 978-1-4377-7840-3


Table of Contents

PrefaceAcknowledgmentChapter 1 The Nanomorphic CellChapter 2 Energy in the Small: Integrated Micro-Scale Energy SourcesChapter 3 Nanomorphic ElectronicsChapter 4 Sensors at the Micro-ScaleChapter 5 Nanomorphic Cell Communication UnitChapter 6 Micron-Sized Systems: In Carbo vs. in SilicoConcluding RemarksIndex