Meals in Science and Practice book cover

Meals in Science and Practice

Interdisciplinary Research and Business Applications

The meal is the key eating occasion, yet professionals and researchers frequently focus on single food products, rather than the combinations of foods and the context in which they are consumed. Research on meals is also carried out in a wide range of fields and the different disciplines do not always benefit from each others’ expertise. This important collection presents contributions on meals from many perspectives, using different methods, and focusing on the different elements involved.

Two introductory chapters in part one summarise the key findings in Dimensions of the Meal, the first book to bring an interdisciplinary perspective to meals, and introduce the current publication by reviewing the key topics discussed in the following chapters. Parts two to four then consider how meals are defined, studied and taught. Major considerations include eating socially and eating alone, the influence of gender, and the different situations of home, restaurant and institutional settings. Part five reviews meals worldwide, with chapters on Brazilian, Indian, Chinese and Thai meals, among others. The final parts discuss meals from further perspectives, including those of the chef, product developer and meal setting designer.

With its distinguished editor and international team of contributors, Meals in science and practice is an informative and diverse reference for both professionals and academic researchers interested in food from disciplines such as food product development, food service, nutrition, dietetics, sociology, anthropology, psychology, public health, medicine and marketing.

Hardbound, 704 Pages

Published: March 2009

Imprint: Woodhead Publishing

ISBN: 978-1-84569-403-6

Contents

  • Part 1 Introduction: Dimensions of the meal: A summary; Meals in science and practice: An overview and summary. Part 2 Defining meals: Definitions of the meal reconsidered: Meals: The social perspective; Foodservice perspective in institutions. Part 3 Studying meals: The study of Nordic meals: Lessons learnt; Meals and gender; Institutional meals; Studying meals in the home and in the laboratory. Part 4 Eating together and eating alone: A table for one: The pain and pleasure of eating alone; The American family meal; The family meal in Europe; Gender perspectives on the solo diner as restaurant customer. Part 5 Teaching through meals: The family meal as a culturally relevant nutrition teaching aid; Culinary arts and meal science as an interdisciplinary university curriculum. Part 6 Meals worldwide: The packaged military meal; French meals; Italian meals; Brazilian meals; Indian meals; Thai meals; Chinese meals; Australian meals. Part 7 Meals in practice/meals as art: Chefs designing flavour for meals; Creating concepts for meals: Perspectives from research and from business practice. Part 8 Further perspectives on meals: Meals, behaviour and brain function; Designing meal environments for “mindful eating”; Kosher and Halal meals; Revisiting British meals.

Advertisement

advert image