Insect Hormones

Editor-in-Chief:

  • Gerald Litwack, Jefferson Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA, USA

Insect biochemistry and molecular genetics have become enormously important sciences. Molecular genetics of drosophila has paced mammalian genetics and has facilitated many advances in mammalian genetics. Moreover, many life-threatening diseases for man are now carried chiefly by insects and our increasing knowledge of the basic science of insects may help to control these diseases. There is no more important facet of insect science than insect hormones, the agents that allow for communication between cells and tissues. This volume updates important areas of this subject, namely: hormonal control of ecdysis; ecdysone receptors in agriculture and medicine; molecular structure of the receptor ligand binding site of ecdysone; a molecular genetic approach to the biosynthesis of the molting hormone; non-steroidal ecdysone agonists; molecular actions of juvenile hormone in drosophila, and insect neuropeptide receptors.
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Audience

Endocrinologists, biochemists, researchers, professors, and graduate students studying the molecular and cellular biology of vitamins, hormones, and related factors and co-factors. In particular for this volume: biochemists and molecular geneticists as well as all researchers and students, who focus on the topic of insect hormones

 

Book information

  • Published: December 2005
  • Imprint: ACADEMIC PRESS
  • ISBN: 978-0-12-709873-9


Table of Contents

1. Hormonal Control of Ecdysis: Endocrine Cascades for Coordinating Behavior with Physiology; 2. A Molecular Genetic Approach to the Biosynthesis of the Insect Steroid Molting Hormone; 3. Ecdysteroid Receptors and their Applications in Agriculture and Medicine; 4. Ligand Binding Pocket of the Ecdysone Receptor; 5. Non-steroidal Ecdysone Agonists; 6. Juvenile Hormone Molecular Actions and Interactions during Development of Drosophila melanogaster; 7. Insect Neuropeptide and Peptide Hormone Receptors: Current Knowledge and Future Directions