DV-Xa for Atomic Spectroscopy and Materials Science

Edited by

  • Michael Zerner, Quantum Theory Project, University of Florida, Gainesville, U.S.A.
  • Erkki Brandas, Uppsala University, Sweden
  • Masayuki Uda, Waseda University, Tokyo, Japan
  • Rika Sekine, Shizuoka University, Shizuoka, Japan
  • Hirohiko Adachi

Series Editor:

  • John Sabin, Quantum Theory Project, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA

Editor-in-Chief:

  • Per-Olov Lowden, Quantum Chemistry Group, Uppsala University, Sweden, and Quantum Theory Project, University of Florida, Gainesville, U.S.A.

Advances in Quantum Chemistry publishes articles and invited reviews by leading international researchers in quantum chemistry. Quantum chemistry deals particularly with the electronic structure of atoms, molecules, and crystalline matter and describes it in terms of electron wave patterns. It uses physical and chemical insight, sophisticated mathematics, and high-speed computers to solve the wave equations and achieve its results. Advances highlights these important, interdisciplinary developments. Volume 37 includes proceedings of the 1998 Korea-Japan DV-Xa Joint Symposium. Emphasis is placed on atomic spectroscopy and material science, including the computation of electronic states of materials.
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Audience

Researchers in quantum chemistry, applied mathematics, biology and physics; universities and industrial research and development groups working on biological molecules and new materials, such as semiconductor chips, polymers, and alloys.

 

Book information

  • Published: October 2000
  • Imprint: ACADEMIC PRESS
  • ISBN: 978-0-12-034837-4

Reviews

"Quantum chemistry has emerged as a subject in it own right. The appearance of a review publication which surveys recent achievements in the field is therefore very appropriate and, when it has the quality of this volume, is most welcome."
--PROCEEDINGS OF THE PHYSICAL SOCIETY


"The juxtaposition of the oldest of quantum chemical studies, atomic structure, and one of the newest, quantum biology, highlights the importance of quantum theory in modern chemistry. Thus, having first opened the book in search of a particular article, the reader is stimulated to delve into fields of which he has but a superficial knowledge. In this way the book can be instrumental in broadening the interests and background of those who turn to it."
--THE ROYAL INSTITUTE OF CHEMISTRY