Current Topics in Developmental Biology book cover

Current Topics in Developmental Biology

This Series provides a comprehensive survey of the major topics in the field of developmental biology. The volumes are valuable to researchers in animal and plant development, as well as to students and professionals who want an introduction to cellular and molecular mechanisms of development. This year marks a major milestone for the Series as it completes its thirtieth year of publication, making it the longest-running forum for contemporary issues in developmental biology.

Audience
Graduate students and researchers in developmental, molecular, and cell biology, as well as genetics, zoology, agriculture, and neuroscience.

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Published: July 1998

Imprint: Academic Press

ISBN: 978-0-12-153140-9

Reviews

  • The study of evolutionary adaptation returns to the center stage of biology with this important volume. This innovative treatise discusses new developments in adaptation, with new methods, and new theoretical foundations, achievements, and prospects for a rich intellectual future. Once again adaptation is established as a fundamental cornerstone of evolution by means of natural selection. This is an insightful reintroduction to the themes that Darwin and his successors regarded as central to any profound understanding of biology.

Contents

  • K. Patterson, O. Cleaver, W. Gerber, M. Grow, C. Newman, and P. Krieg, Homobox Genes in Cardiovascular Development.K. Hartfelder and W. Engels, Social Insect Polymorphism-Hormonal Regulation of Plasticity in Development and Reproduction in the Honey Bee.J.L. Smith and G.C. Schoenwolf, Getting Organized: New Insights into the Organizer of Higher Vertebrates.A.J. Durston, J. van der Wees, W.W.M. Pijnappel, and S.F. Godsave, Retinoids and Related Signalsin Early Development of the Vertebrate Central Nervous System.C.A. Erickson and M.V. Reedy, Neural Crest Development: The Interplay Between Morphogenesis and Cell Differentiation.J.R. Finnery, Homoboxes in Sea Anemones and Other Non-Bilaterian Animals: Implications for the Evolution of the Hox Cluster and the Zootype.Y. Iwasa, The Conflict Theory of Genomic Imprinting: How Much Can be Explained?Subject Index.

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