Criminology

Explaining Crime and Its Context

By

  • Stephen Brown
  • Finn-Aage Esbensen
  • Gilbert Geis

This highly acclaimed criminology text presents an up-to-date review of rational choice theories, including deterrence, shaming, and routine activities. It also incorporates current examples of deterrence research regarding domestic violence, drunk driving, and capital punishment, and features thought-provoking discussion of the relativity of crime. The authors explore the crime problem, its context, and causes of crime.

The organization of the text reflects the fact that the etiology of crime must be at the heart of criminology. It examines contemporary efforts to redefine crime by focusing on family violence, hate crimes, white-collar misconduct with violent consequences, and other forms of human behavior often neglected by criminologists.

Extensive discussion of evolving laws is included, and while the prevalence of the scientific method in the field of criminology is highlighted, the impact of ideology on explanations of crime is the cornerstone of the book.

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Audience

Criminal Justice and Sociology students.

 

Book information

  • Published: August 2012
  • Imprint: ANDERSON PUBLISHING
  • ISBN: 978-1-4557-3010-0

Reviews

"While the prevalence of the scientific method in the field of criminology is highlighted, the impact of ideology on explanations of crime is the cornerstone of the book."--Evidence Technology Magazine, July-August 2013
"The text is updated with recent examples and contains new chapter objectives and discussion questions. The book is illustrated with color photos in a clean layout."--Reference and Research Book News, December 2012




Table of Contents

Preface 

Part I: Foundations for Criminology
1 Crime and Criminology 
2 The Relativity of Law and Crime 
3 Production of Crime Statistics 
4 Distribution of Crime 

Part II: Theories of Crime
5 Deterrence and Rational Choice Theories of Crime 
6 Individual Theories of Crime: A Biosocial Perspective
7 Social Structure Theories of Crime 
8 Social Process Theories of Crime 
9 Social Reaction Theories of Crime 
10 New Directions: Integration and a Life-Course Perspective

Part III: Types of Crime
11 Violent Crime 
12 Economic Crime 
13 Crimes without Victims and Victims without Crimes 

Author Index
Subject Index