Computers and Conversation

Edited by

  • Paul Luff
  • David Frohlich
  • Nigel Gilbert, University of Surrey

In the past few years a branch of sociology, conversation analysis, has begun to have a significant impact on the design of human*b1computer interaction (HCI). The investigation of human*b1human dialogue has emerged as a fruitful foundation for interactive system design.****This book includes eleven original chapters by leading researchers who are applying conversation analysis to HCI. The fundamentals of conversation analysis are outlined, a number of systems are described, and a critical view of their value for HCI is offered.****Computers and Conversation will be of interest to all concerned with HCI issues--from the advanced student to the professional computer scientist involved in the design and specification of interactive systems.
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Researchers and advanced students in human*b1computer interaction, social implications of computing, ergonomics, and computational linguistics.


Book information

  • Published: January 1990
  • ISBN: 978-0-12-459560-6


"This book presents an excellent set of papers discussing the pros and cons of designing computer systems using principles of human behavior."

Table of Contents

P. Luff, Introduction. R. Wooffitt, On the Analysis of Interaction: An Introduction to Conversation Analysis. H. Robinson, Towards a Sociology of Human*b1Computer Interaction: A Software Engineer's Perspective. M. Norman and P. Thomas, The Very Idea: Informing HCI Design from Conversation Analysis. G. Button, Going Up a Blind Alley: Conflating Conversation Analysis and Computational Modelling. P. McIlvenny, Communicative Action and Computers: Re-Embodying Conversation Analysis? D. Good, Repair and Cooperation in Conversation. P. Raudaskoski, Repair Work in Human*b1Computer Interaction: A Conversation Analytic Perspective. A. Finkelstein and H. Fuks, Conversation Analysis and Specification. D. Frohlich and P. Luff, Applying the Technology of Conversation to the Technology for Conversation. A. Cawsey, A Computational Model of Explanatory Discourse: Local Interactions in a Plan-Based Explanation. N. Gilbert, R. Wooffitt, and N. Fraser, Organising Computer Talk. Notes on Transcription Conventions.References. Index.