Brainstem Function and Dysfunction

Edited by

  • Giorgio Cruccu, Department of Neurological Sciences, La Sapienza University, Rome, Italy Professor of Neurology
  • Mark Hallett, School of Medicine and Health Sciences, George Washington University, Washington, DC, USA

The book is dedicated to physiological, neuroimaging and clinical studies on brainstem function. It is divided in four sections: Anatomy and Imaging, Physiology, Pain, and Movement Disorders.
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Audience

Clinical Neurophysiologists, Basic Neurophysiologists, Neuroanatomists, Neuroscientists, Neurologists, Neuro-ophthalmologists,
Pain specialists in migraine and orofacial pains

 

Book information

  • Published: March 2006
  • Imprint: ELSEVIER
  • ISBN: 978-0-444-52071-5


Table of Contents

Preface.
List of Contributors.
Section I. Anatomy and Imaging.
1. Corticobulbar tracts (M. Hallett, G. Cruccu).2. Head eye-movement control model based on enetically selected neural network (N. Accornero, M. Capozza).3. Eye and eyelid movements during blinking: an eye blink center? (B.W. Ongerboer de Visser, L.J. Bour).4. 3D brainstem topodiagnosis – a voxel-based model analysing MR imaging data (J.J. Marx et al.).5. Functional activity mapping of brainstem nociceptive networks in animals (C.A. Porro, F. Lui).6. Brainstem functional imaging in humans (I. Tracey, G.D. Iannetti).
Section II. Physiology.
7. Laboratory and clinical investigations of the region of the rostral brainstem in motor control (D. Nandi et al.).8. Functional properties of brainstem motoneurons following their reinnervation of native or foreign muscles (J.M. Delgado-García, A. Gruart).9. Prepulse modulation of the startle reaction during preparation for movement execution (H. Kumru et al.).10. Trigemino-cervical reflexes: clinical applications and neuroradiological correlations (V. Di Lazzaro et al.).11. What the vestibulo-spinal system does and what it does not (A.M. Bronstein).12. Investigation of brainstem: descending pain modulation in animals and humans (D. Bouhassira, N. Danziger).
Section III. Pain.
13. Neuropathic facial pain (M. Haanpää, A. Truini).14. Diagnosis of trigeminal neuralgia: a new appraisal based on clinical and neurophysiological findings (G. Cruccu et al.).15. Pain and itch in the Wallenberg's syndrome: anatomical–functional correlations (S. Fitzek et al.).16. Long-term depression of orofacial somatosensory processing (J. Ellrich).
17. Laser evoked potentials in primary headaches: a possible clinical or research tool? (M. Valeriani, D. Le Pera, F. Vigevano).
Section IV. Movement Disorders.
8. The startle reflex, voluntary movement and the reticulospinal tract (J.C. Rothwell).19. Auditory startle responses as a probe of brainstem function in healthy subjects and patients with movement disorders (M. Kofler, J. Müller, J. Valls-Solé).20. Neurophysiological aids to the diagnosis of progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) (J. Valls-Solé).21. Recent findings in cranial and cervical dystonia: how they help us to understand the pathophysiology of dystonia (A. Currà, S. Bagnato, A. Berardelli).22. Two physiological aspects of the electrically elicited blink reflex: motor unit potentials recruitment and levator palpebrae inhibitory components (Á. Esteban, J. Prieto, A. Traba).23. Neurovascular conflict and hemifacial spasm (M. Sindou et al.).
Subject Index.