Auditory Spectral Processing book cover

Auditory Spectral Processing

All natural auditory signals, including human speech and animal communication signals, are spectrally and temporally complex, that is, they contain multiple frequencies and their frequency composition, or spectrum, varies over time. The ability of hearers to identify and localize these signals depends on analysis of their spectral composition. For the overwhelming majority of human listeners spoken language is the major means of social communication, and this communication therefore depends on spectral analysis. Spectral analysis begins in the cochlea, but is then elaborated at various stages along the auditory pathways in the brain that lead from the cochlea to the cerebral cortex. The broad purpose of this book is to provide a comprehensive account of the way in which spectral information is processed in the brain and the way in which this information is used by listeners to identify and localize sounds.

Audience
Psychophysicists, neurophysiologists, audiologists, otolaryngologists and neuroscientists.

Hardbound, 560 Pages

Published: November 2005

Imprint: Academic Press

ISBN: 978-0-12-366871-4

Contents

  • Auditory spectral processing: An overviewSpectral processing by the peripheral auditory system: Facts and modelsBasic psychophysics of human spectral processingAcross-channel spectral processingSpeech and music have different requirements for spectral resolution Nonlinearities and the representation of auditory spectraSpectral processing in the inferior colliculusNeural mechanisms for spectral analysis in the auditory midbrain, thalamus, and cortexSpectral processing in the auditory cortexDynamic spectral processingRepresentations of spectral coding in the human brainSpectral processing and sound source determinationSpectral information in sound localizationPlasticity of spectral processingSpectral processing in cochlear implants

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