Advances in the Study of Behavior book cover

Advances in the Study of Behavior

The aim of Advances in the Study of Behavior is to serve scientists engaged in the study of animal behavior, including psychologists, neuroscientists, biologists, ethologists, pharmacologists, endocrinologists, ecologists, and geneticists. Articles in the series present critical reviews of significant research programs with theoretical syntheses, reformulation of persistent problems, and/or highlighting new and exciting research concepts. Volume 34 is purely eclectic and illustrates the breadth of behavior research. Contents include sexual conflict among insects, the evolution of sexual cannibalism, odor processing and activity patterns in honeybees, hormone secretion in vertebrates, bird song organization, food transfer in primates, game theory approaches to mutualism, as well as neural mechanisms of learning and memory and how these change during infant development.

Audience
Experimental psychologists studying animal behavior, comparative psychologists, ethologists, evolutionary biologists, and ichthyologists.

Paperback, 520 Pages

Published: December 2004

Imprint: Academic Press

ISBN: 978-0-12-004534-1

Reviews

  • "The series is designed for psychologists, zoologists, and psychiatrists, but will also be a valuable reference for workers in endocrinology, neurology, physiology, ethnology, and ecology." --BIOLOGICAL ABSTRACTS

Contents

  • J. Heinze, Reproductive Conflict in Insect Societies.R. Bshary and J.L. Bronstein, Game Structures in Mutualistic Interactions.T.L. Roth, D.A. Wilson, and R.M. Sullivan, Neurobehavioral Development of Infant Learning and Memory.M.A. Elgar and J.M. Schneider, The Evolutionary Significance of Sexual Cannibalism.R.F. Oliveira, Social Modulation of Androgens in Vertebrates.H. Lachnit, M. Giurfa, and R. Menzel, Odor Processing in Honeybees.G.R. Brown, R.E.A. Almond, and Y. Van Bergen, Begging, Stealing, and Offering.K. Okanoya, Song Syntax in Bengalese Finches.P.G. Wilmer and G.N. Stone, Behavioral, Ecological, and Physiological Determinants of the Activity Patterns of Bees.

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