Potential New Targets for Antidepressant Medications

New study published in Biological Psychiatry

Philadelphia, PA, August 27, 2008 – The news about antidepressant medications over the past several years has been mixed. The bad news from large multicenter studies such as STAR*D is that current antidepressant medications are effective, but not as effective as one might hope. Thus, there is a significant need for new treatment mechanisms for depression. On that front, there has been mixed news as well. One of the most exciting new drugs to reach human clinical trials, one that blocks the corticotrophin releasing factor-1 (CRF1) receptor, did not work in a large clinical trial sponsored by Pfizer Pharmaceuticals. Is it time to abandon CRF1 antagonists as antidepressants or should we revisit these agents from a new perspective? It is in this context that a new paper by Alexandre Surget and colleagues, scheduled for publication in the August 15th issue of Biological Psychiatry, is particularly interesting.

Through prior work, it has been shown that the ability to reverse the stress-related disruption of hippocampal neurogenesis, the ability of the brain to make new nerve cells in adulthood, was important to the actions of our available antidepressant medications. In this new study, the researchers affirm the prior findings, but suggest that two experimental approaches to the treatment of depression, blockade of the CRF1 receptor or the vasopressin-1B (V1B) receptor, retain their efficacy in reversing the impact of stress on behavior even when neurogenesis is disrupted. Catherine Belzung, Ph.D., corresponding author on this article, further explains that “we now report evidence that restoration of the functioning of the stress axis may be the key to how these new antidepressant approaches might work.”

How can one reconcile these interesting research findings in animals with the lack of antidepressant efficacy of a CRF1 receptor antagonist in the Pfizer study? Is this approach simply ineffective in humans or might there be subgroups of patients who might be more likely to respond to a CRF1 antagonist? The Surget et al. data raise the possibility that CRF1 receptor antagonists might be effective in treating stress-related behavioral disturbances even in a context where other antidepressants do not work, perhaps due to disruption of neurogenesis. John H. Krystal, M.D., Editor of Biological Psychiatry and affiliated with both Yale University School of Medicine and the VA Connecticut Healthcare System, comments: “These findings lend weight to the hope that CRF1 antagonists might play a role in the treatment of antidepressant-resistant symptoms of depression or posttraumatic stress disorder. If so, CRF1 antagonists could fulfill an important unmet need.” He adds that “we do not need another Prozac, but we urgently need to find ways to help the large number of patients who fail to respond adequately to our available treatments.”

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Notes to Editors:
The article is “Drug-Dependent Requirement of Hippocampal Neurogenesis in a Model of Depression and of Antidepressant Reversal” by Alexandre Surget, Michael Saxe, Samuel Leman, Yadira Ibarguen-Vargas, Sylvie Chalon, Guy Griebel, René Hen, and Catherine Belzung. Drs. Surget, Leman, Ibarguen-Vargas, Chalon, and Belzung are affiliated with INSERM, U930, Université François Rabelais, Tours, France. Drs. Saxe and Hen are with the Center for Neurobiology and Behavior, Columbia University, New York, New York. Dr. Griebel is from the CNS Research Department, Sanofi-Aventis, Bagneux, France. The article appears in Biological Psychiatry, Volume 64, Issue 4 (August 15, 2008), published by Elsevier.

The authors’ disclosures of financial and conflicts of interests are available in the article. Dr. Krystal's disclosures of financial and conflicts of interests are available here.

Full text of the article mentioned above is available upon request. Contact Jayne M. Dawkins at (215) 239-3674 or ja.dawkins@elsevier.com to obtain a copy or to schedule an interview.

About Biological Psychiatry
This international rapid-publication journal is the official journal of the Society of Biological Psychiatry. It covers a broad range of topics in psychiatric neuroscience and therapeutics. Both basic and clinical contributions are encouraged from all disciplines and research areas relevant to the pathophysiology and treatment of major neuropsychiatric disorders. Full-length and Brief Reports of novel results, Commentaries, Case Studies of unusual significance, and Correspondence and Comments judged to be of high impact to the field are published, particularly those addressing genetic and environmental risk factors, neural circuitry and neurochemistry, and important new therapeutic approaches. Concise Reviews and Editorials that focus on topics of current research and interest are also published rapidly.

Biological Psychiatry (www.sobp.org/journal) is ranked 4th out of the 95 Psychiatry titles and 16th out of 199 Neurosciences titles on the 2006 ISI Journal Citations Reports® published by Thomson Scientific.

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