New recommendations by scientific societies about late-onset hypogonadism

ISA, ISSAM, EAU, EAA and ASA publish in European Urology

Arnhem, 04 December 2008 - The January issue of European Urology, the official journal of the European Association of Urology published by Elsevier, will feature new recommendations on late-onset hypogonadism (LOH), recently formulated by major scientific organizations. LOH is a clinical and biochemical syndrome associated with advancing age and characterized by typical symptoms and a deficiency in serum testosterone levels.

Late-onset hypogonadism (LOH) is caused by a decline in gonadal production of androgens in males that occurs with aging. Data indicate that a significant percentage of men over age 60 have serum testosterone levels that are below the lower limits of young adult men (i.e., those age 20–30 yr). Sexual dysfunction - including erectile dysfunction (ED), decreased libido, difficulty achieving orgasm, and decreased penile sensation - is usually the presenting complaint, although fatigue, depressed mood, and decreased muscle mass are other common symptoms.

Because demographic data demonstrate that the percentage of the population in older age groups is increasing worldwide, LOH is becoming a topic of increasing interest and debate throughout the world. The past decade has brought evidence that androgen treatment benefits hypogonadal men, and recent studies show short-term beneficial effects of testosterone in older men that are similar to those in younger men.

In view of the growing interest from practitioners in the testosterone treatment of older men, the International Society of Andrology (ISA), the International Society for the Study of the Aging Male (ISSAM), the European Association of Urology (EAU), the European Academy of Andrology (EAA), and the American Society of Andrology (ASA) convened meetings of a writing group with expert representatives from each of the societies. They met in Tampa, Florida, in 2008 to revise the recommendations on the “Investigation, Treatment, and Monitoring of Late-Onset Hypogonadism” originally published by the ISA, ISSAM, and EAU in 2005.

The current recommendations provide updated evidence-based information for clinicians who diagnose and treat patients with LOH. These guidelines are available in the January 2009 issue of European Urology.


# # #

Notes to Editors:
The article “Investigation, Treatment, and Monitoring of Late-Onset Hypogonadism in Males: ISA, ISSAM, EAU, EAA, and ASA Recommendations”, by Christina Wang, Eberhard Nieschlag, Ronald Swerdloff, Hermann M. Behre, Wayne J. Hellstrom, Louis J. Gooren, Jean M. Kaufman, Jean-Jacques Legros, Bruno Lunenfeld, Alvaro Morales, John E. Morley, Claude Schulman, Ian M. Thompson, Wolfgang Weidner, and Frederick C.W. Wu is being published in European Urology 55 (2009) 121–130, DOI:10.1016/j.eururo.2008.08.033. Copies for members of the media are available by contacting the Elsevier press office at newsroom@elsevier.com.

About the European Association of Urology (EAU)
The European Association of Urology (EAU) represents more than 16,000 urology professionals across Europe and worldwide. Its mission is to raise the level of urological care in Europe. The EAU has special sections on the Internet, such as Uroweb and Urosource, which allow for direct communication. European Urology, produced by the EAU, has been a respected urological forum for over 20 years, and is currently read by more than 9,000 urologists across the globe. With an impact factor of 5.634, the journal has become the leading scientific publication in the field of urology.

About Elsevier

Elsevier is a world-leading provider of information solutions that enhance the performance of science, health, and technology professionals, empowering them to make better decisions, deliver better care, and sometimes make groundbreaking discoveries that advance the boundaries of knowledge and human progress. Elsevier provides web-based, digital solutions — among them ScienceDirect, Scopus, Elsevier Research Intelligence, and ClinicalKey — and publishes nearly 2,200 journals, including The Lancet and Cell, and over 25,000 book titles, including a number of iconic reference works.

The company is part of Reed Elsevier Group PLC, a world leading provider of professional information solutions in the Science, Medical, Legal and Risk and Business sectors, which is jointly owned by Reed Elsevier PLC and Reed Elsevier NV. The ticker symbols are REN (Euronext Amsterdam), REL (London Stock Exchange), RUK and ENL (New York Stock Exchange).

Media Contact:
Koos Admiraal
Elsevier
+31 20 485 3747
k.admiraal@elsevier.com