Content Innovations supported by MethodsX

About MethodsX journal

MethodsX

MethodsX publishes the small but important customizations that researchers make to methods. It provides an outlet for technical information that can be useful for others working in the same field, and help them save time in their own research. MethodsX welcomes submissions from all research areas.

MethodsX puts the technical aspects of work into the spotlight. It publishes essential details of the tweaks scientists make to a method in a novel "micro-article" format hence avoiding scientists spending time on writing up a traditional article (with detailed background and contextual information).

For some customizations it might be relevant to also provide supplementary research data to help the reader understand better how the customization has been done. Supplementary data sets will be made available for download via the online version of the published article. For a selected set of research data formats, Elsevier offers inline interactive tools allowing readers to interactively explore research data.

Interactive data exploration tools available for MethodsX

Seven data exploration tools are offered for MethodsX authors and readers. Please follow the exact instructions listed below when preparing and submitting your data sets. Please note that If you need to submit a zip file rather than uncompressed files, you will have to send it by email at MethodsX@elsevier.com.

Interactive toolSubmission instructions
3D molecules
3D viewer for molecular models
You can enrich your online articles by providing 3D molecular models in PDB, PSE or MOL/MOL2 format, which will be visualized using the interactive viewer embedded within the article. Using the viewer, it will be possible to zoom into the model, rotate and pan the model, and change display settings. Submitted models will also be available for downloading from your online article on ScienceDirect. Each molecular model will have to be uploaded to the online submission system separately. For more information see: http://www.elsevier.com/3DMolecularModels.
neuroimaging

3D viewer for neuroimaging data
You can enrich your online articles by providing 3D neuroimaging data in NIfTI format. This will be visualized for readers using the interactive viewer embedded within your article, and will enable them to: browse through available neuroimaging datasets; zoom, rotate and pan the 3D brain reconstruction; cut through the volume; change opacity and color mapping; switch between 3D and 2D projected views; and download the data. Recommended size of a single uncompressed data set is 100 MB or less. Multiple datasets can be submitted. Each .nii dataset will have to be uploaded to the online submission system separately. For more information see: http://www.elsevier.com/3DNeuroimaging.
U3D models

3D viewer for U3D models
U3D models are traditionally used for embedding 3D models in the PDF files. Thanks to the U3D viewer that Elsevier developed, U3D models can be visualized next to online articles on ScienceDirect. 

You can enrich your online articles by providing 3D models in the U3D format. Each .u3d file will have to be uploaded to online submission system. Please be advised that the recommended model size is 50-100 MB. Multiple models can be submitted. For more information see http://www.elsevier.com/about/content-innovation/u3d-models
chemical compounds
Chemical compounds viewer
You can enrich your online article by visualizing and providing details of chemical structures you define as the main chemical compounds. For this purpose, corresponding mol files will have to be uploaded via the online submission system. Each compound needs to be submitted as a separate mol file. Please use your preferred drawing tool to export chemical structures as mol files and ensure that they are unique, complete and do not contain any R-groups or other variables so that a correct InChI key can be generated. For more information see http://www.elsevier.com/mol
Google Maps 
Google Maps for KLM files
You can enrich your online articles by providing KML files which will be visualized using Google maps. The KMLfiles can be uploaded in our online submission system. KML is an XML schema for expressing geographic annotation and visualization within Internet-based Earth browsers. Elsevier will generate Google Maps from the submitted KML files and include these in the article when published online. Submitted KML files will also be available for downloading from your online article on ScienceDirect. For more information see http://www.elsevier.com/googlemaps
phylogenetic trees

Interactive phylogenetic tree viewer
You can enrich your online articles by providing phylogenetic tree data files in Newick or NeXML format, which will be visualized using the interactive tree viewer embedded within the online article. Using the viewer it will be possible to zoom into certain tree areas, change the tree layout, search within the tree, and collapse/expand tree nodes and branches. Submitted tree files will also be available for downloading from your online article on ScienceDirect. Each tree must be contained in an individual data file before being uploaded separately to the online submission system. Newick files must have the extension .new or .nwk (note that a semicolon is needed to end the tree). Please do not enclose comments in Newick files and also delete any artificial line breaks within the tree data because these will stop the tree from showing. For NeXML, the file extension should be .xml. Please do not enclose comments in the file. Tree data submitted with other file extensions will not be processed. Please make sure that you validate your Newick/NeXML files prior to submission. For more information please see http://www.elsevier.com/phylogenetictrees.
MATLAB figures
MATLAB viewer for FIG files
You can enrich your online articles by providing supplementary MATLAB figure files with the .fig file extension. These files will be visualized using an interactive viewer that allows readers to explore your figures within the article.  The FIG files can be uploaded in our online submission system, and will be made available to download from your online article on ScienceDirect. For more information, please see http://www.elsevier.com/matlab.